JoeT

Airport Express to enhance signal

8 posts in this topic

I am considering purchasing an Airport Express to replace the wireless signal currently being output from my Verizon FiOS router. The main reason for doing this is because of a crumby Dell computer two floors up that my father uses...it constantly has the wireless signal drop off. Then, the computer links to a nearby network and not my own. I know the Wireless N of the Airport Express will not really provide any speed boast to the G adapter found in that computer, but will it enhance the signal so that that computer maintains a stronger signal?

 

Also, I have the FiOS package that gives me 35/35 network speed (although I don't really get that in real world), will the Airport Express affect that speed, or it is purely an enhancement in range. The Macs I have in the basement will possess Wireless N capability, so will I notice any difference in wireless signal.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am by no means an expert in networking but here are my thoughts -

 

A) It sounds to me like the problem is either in the network adapter in the Dell and/or building structure preventing the signal from getting to the Dell. Have you tried putting one of your Macs in the same space as the Dell to see if the signal drop is machine-specific? If it's machine-specific, you may want to replace the network adapter in the Dell with one capable of N speed and range.

B) It's my understanding that if you have any G device in the network, that will be the maximum throughput for the entire network regardless of the individual machine capabilities

C) If it turns out to be a structural problem (which is actually my guess anyway), I would suggest you use the Express (or some other cheaper solution) to connect to the current router and create a new network just for that G machine. That way, your N-capable Macs won't be affected by the G machine because it won't be in the same network. Note that I would manually configure that new network with an IP significantly outside the range of your main network to avoid duplicate IP assignment (because you are likely using DHCP on the regular network)

 

Good luck and please update the forum on your results.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

upgrade the Dell to Wireless N. use a internal card or a USB. make sure it's a new modern multi-band capable.

 

upgrade your main router to something that supports multi band N. the new Airport Extreme has multiple bands of N for speeds up to 90Mbits a second. although getting it working this fast will depend entirely on the connected device.

 

the router doesn't have to be from Apple. Netgear, ASUS, Buffalo, and Cisco make fine routers. you might find a) a cheaper solution B) something that works faster c) has awesome range.

Edited by johnfoster
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha, this has no relation to the topic at hand but it appears that this forum needs a way to keep 'b + )' from turning into B)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, thanks for the those ideas. I will try them out and report back in a couple of days.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there is a "button on the side" in the "full editor" that if you uncheck will disable 12 year old girl mode.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For pure range extending, I found that using an Airport Express worked, but wasn't always reliable nor did it provide the best performance. The solution I ended up with was to go "hard wired", but since I couldn't easily run Ethernet in the wall I ended up using Powerline adapters that use my home wiring. The speed is marginal, I get 50 Mbps, but they are rock solid on connectivity. In the right environment you can get upwards of 200Mbps in theory. I have some from Belkin, but Amazon has a bunch of options: http://www.amazon.com/b?ie=UTF8&node=1194444. In my setup I go from one of the port on my Airport Extreme into the Belkin Powerline adapter. Then I have the other Powerline adapter in the room I want to supply connectivity to. In there I have the adapter run into an ethernet switch so I can hardwire devices like my Apple TV, but then i also attached my Airport Express to the Ethernet switch to create a separate WiFi zone for that area of the house.

 

If you're interested I did two Maccast Member episodes on how to extend the range of your wi-fi. I know you'd have to become a Maccast Member if you're not one already, but it may be worth the $5 to sign up for one month just to get those two episodes.

 

Maccast Members 064 - Extending Wi-Fi

Maccast Members 065 - Extending Wi-Fi (part 2)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

usually the problem with extending a network using an ethernet cable is something called "wife" who demands "no holes, no holes at all." it doesn't matter if it's your "Wife" or somebody elses. the command is the same. having never installed one of these I can't possibly understand why a hole is such a problem.

 

that said, I've had success in hiding a cable outside of the house. there are several places to stuff a cable high and low. the hole in the wall is easily hidden. once the cable is back inside you can just dangle the cable or you can hide it proper in a wall box that you cut into the dry wall then patch and paint.

Edited by johnfoster
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now