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SODIMM vs. SDRAM


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#1 Animal

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 11:21 AM

Hi folks,

Quick question that most of you could probably answer for me. On the Apple site, it describes my macbook's ram as DDR2 SDRAM. Okay, fine. But only SODIMM ram fits notebooks, right?

So I'm thinking SODIMM means it's notebook, so there is probably SODIMM SDRAM, and SODIMM "other ram here", etc. But every SODIMM stick I look at mentions nothing about being SDRAM or not. DDR2 is easy enough to find, but should I be looking for that SDRAM designation before I buy as well?

Here's one of the one's I'm looking at:

http://www.tigerdire...51&sku=ULT33060

Now I just have to decide to buy one or two sticks of it as well...

#2 pwbeninate

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 12:56 PM

Yeah, memory can get quite confusing :(

Basically, SODIMM is usually used to indicate notebook memory. Pretty much all modern computers use DDR2 (or at least DDR). So what you are looking for is probably SODIMM DDR2 which is a type of SDRAM :)

A quick and dirty way to see what kind of memory your Mac takes is to check dealram.com and use their Find by System list at the top.

#3 Animal

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 01:13 PM

Thanks for the input.

Yep, I pretty much did exactly what you said, except at Other World Computing. Same thing, though. I'm buying a hard drive and one stick of 1gb from tigerdirect.ca in the end. (I have had some bad luck with duties lately..)

In any case, if I decide to go even faster later, I can just order up the other stick of ram. :D

#4 themacman4

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 02:11 PM

There are three basic types of memory
SIMM
DIMM
RIMM

DIMM's are common in any new computer (at least mid 90's and up). SIMM's were before DIMM's and RIMM's are kind of like the weird memory that no one uses. What SODIMM's are are miniture versions of DIMM's one designed to fit into a notebook. Currently I they are in the iMac as well. I was taking with an Apple rep. and he told me that they had DIMM's in the old iMac G5's (just a little side fact). Anyway SODIMM's should be in all notebooks (but I'm not sure about laptops, I'm pretty sure them too all the time).

#5 The Professor

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 03:38 PM

So I'm thinking SODIMM means it's notebook, so there is probably SODIMM SDRAM, and SODIMM "other ram here", etc. But every SODIMM stick I look at mentions nothing about being SDRAM or not. DDR2 is easy enough to find, but should I be looking for that SDRAM designation before I buy as well?


SDRAM describes a type of memory chip. This can be further specified in the case of Intel Macs as DDR2 SDRAM. DDR describes a practice of reading/writing memory twice per clock square wave. Earlier, pre-DDR memory was only read or written once per clock cycle.

SODIMM describes a type of printed circuit board that has a certain physical format and which always carries some type of memory chips upon it. You will often hear a description of the physical connector given in association with the term SODIMM, ie 200-pin.

While SODIMMs are typically used in notebooks they are also sometimes used in larger computers as well, for example the Intel iMacs use SODIMM cards.

One might think of an Intel iMac as being very much like a notebook that has been attached permanently to the rear of a 17" or 20" LCD. The important difference is that the iMac uses larger, faster 3.5" hard drives, while notebooks usually have dinky, slow 2.5" hard drives.




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