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dmcleer

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About dmcleer

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    Mac Geek In Training

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  • Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
  • Interests
    Art, Music, Computers, Photography
  1. dmcleer

    When to upgrade to Intel?

    Well, you all have affirmed my own opinion. We are going to wait. Joshr, you are absoultely right. I had forgotten that the old apps will run on Intel Macs. So, eventually, when the timing is more realistic, we can upgrade the hardware and software when needed. The 4 designers with the G4s (I am one of them), should be able to squeak out another year or two out of the machines. Like I mentioned in the first post, we just went through a major hardware and software upgrade process early last year, before any Intel machines were released. It doesn't make much sense to be "scared" of the new Intel G5 replacement before it is even released. As for Quark vs. InDesign: You are preaching to the choir, my friend. That program has been nothing but a headache for me since I began using it in the early 1990s. Although, back then, it was the "Cat's Meow." Personally, I have been slowly transitioning to InDesign. (It's hard to teach an old dog new tricks though, when the deadlines-a-cometh.) Our agency actually has a mix of InDesign and Quark users. Unfortunately, we have to keep Quark on-hand for print vendors who don't have InDesign.
  2. dmcleer

    When to upgrade to Intel?

    Thanks for the thoughts. Your sentiments were what I have been thinking too. But, it's always nice to have a second opinion...
  3. dmcleer

    When to upgrade to Intel?

    I am interested in your opinion regarding the looming change to Intel Power Macs: Here's a little background info. I work in an ad agency where we have a mix of 15+ G4 and G5 towers, plus another 10+ newer IBM chip iMacs. We are looking at our upgrade options in relation to the future of the PowerPC G5s, now that the intel chips are out and there's talk of the G5 PowerPC being replaced later this year. About a year ago, we went through an agency-wide software upgrade for all the G4/G5 tower users (graphic designers). We are now all on OSX, and have updated graphic apps. However, there are still 4 of us that have older G4 towers (Quicksilver/mirrored front machines-circa 2002), while all the other designers have the newer aluminum G5s. Our dilemma is when to flow into a new upgrade schedule. If we wait until the G5 is replaced by Intel chip machines we will need to purchase Adobe Creative Suite 3, Quark XPress 7, and numberous other software upgrades for the Intel Macs to function. (Our current software will be no good on an Intel PowerMac, right?) We seem to have 3 options for upgrading and being current with software: 1. Do nothing and leave all of the computers as they are for a few years, then go through another major upgrade of hardware and software. 2. Wait to replace the 4 or 5 older G4's when the new Intel towers are available. We will also have to purchase new Adobe, Quark, and other software for these new machines. 3. Purchase aluminum G5's now, to replace these 4-5 older G4s. We'll have the expense of the new machines, but no additional software costs. Additionally, we'll have the added benefit of running the same versions of software on all the graphic designers' machines. What do you think we should do? I appreciate any opinions. Thanks!
  4. dmcleer

    Apple vs Apple

    Here's another article related to this news: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-...2170741,00.html Good news for Apple!
  5. And the media is clammering about OSX "viruses": http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1945808,00.asp To be fair, the rootkit problem affects ALL operating systems; that is, if targeted. The nice thing about OSX at this point in time is that it is still doesn't have a high enough profile to be the target of malicious coders. While it's true that one of the big reasons reason Windows gets hit so hard by Malware is the way it is designed, another factor is its' popoularity. Don't get me wrong. Because of my job, I am a "slider". But I do love my Macs more than my XP boxes. Mac on!
  6. dmcleer

    Just some light-hearted fun

    You've probably heard this one before, but I think it's funny every time I hear it: They say when you play that Microsoft CD backward you can hear satanic messages ... but that's nothing. If you play it forward it will install Windows.
  7. dmcleer

    Mac Mini DVR

    Awesome! The ability to use a Mac mini as a DVR seems an obvious use... http://blog.wired.com/cultofmac/
  8. OK, When I first posted about the article I read on USA today's site, I thought it could hold a bit of genuine, helpful information to us in the Mac community. Over the past few weeks, as the topic of Mac vulnerabilities has indeed spread like wildfire, I think have began to understand the conversation. I believe that there are vulnerabilities in OSX. But, the fact is that no OS is 100% vulnerability free. The only vulnerability free OS is one that does not interact with the Internet. But then, what good would it be? The fact is that all Mac OS' have probably had security vulnerabilities, the security issues were just never brought out into the public like in the past few weeks. The truth of the matter is that OSX is a more robust, more secure system than OS9, OS8.5, OS 8.1, OS 7, etc. etc. etc. Again, all this recent hype says is that Mac OSX is now being perceived as a threat to others. Macs have been considered a small, special little group, that have never posed any threat to ther interests of big brother Windows. The outcry of Mac vulnerabilities is a natural response to "little brother" becoming bigger. Perhaps one day, little brother Mac will grow big enough to kick big brother Windows @$$ in market share. Frankly, as I wrap up this post, I am getting tired and bored with the "sky is falling" tone of the media hype. I am not worried at all about my OSX being secure. I love this contest by a guy at the UW Madison. He's basically saying "bring it on!" :-) http://test.doit.wisc.edu/
  9. Perhaps i'm just dreamimg this stuff up: http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=0...419208&from=rss
  10. I guess I didn't read "OMFG We're going to die" into the article on USA today... My only point was my surprise that it is making the mainstream press. I've been using Mac's a long time, and Apple II's before that back in the 80's. And perhaps I am naive, but I have never even been heard of a Mac virus before. It just surprised me that someone took the time to write a USA Today article about it. I think that says something about the Mac become more a part of popular culture than it has been. I'm sure you're right in that there were viruses in OS9 too. I don't doubt that a bit. I just found it interesting that an article was dedicated to the "First OSX Worm"... Long live the Worm-free Mac. :-)
  11. We Mac addicts have always prided ourselves on being relatively virus-free. Looks like we are moving into an age where we have more concerns about Virus' on on beloved Macs. Say it isn't so: http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/computer...irst-worm_x.htm Adam has mentioned it in past shows, and this seems to confirm that Macs are becoming more and more popular.
  12. Very interesting article. I'd love to be a fly on the wall at Apple when they are preparing for a keynote... http://technology.guardian.co.uk/weekly/st...1677772,00.html
  13. dmcleer

    Windows "Longhorn" named Windows Vista

    Check out the Vista section on Microsoft's site: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsvista/default.mspx There are screen shots throughout. The Windows Sidebar (see screen shot in the "Organization" section) is soooo much a bad attempt to copy the dashboard feature of Tiger. I have been a Mac user since 1992. Unfortunately, I have also been a Windows user since Windows 3.1 (a government job that only had Windows made it a necessity :-P) I have always been frustrated with the nit-picky little ways that any of the Windows OS' have operated. Windows OS systems have always seemed counter-intuitive, and geared more for techies who love to dig for information. I am a designer by trade, and have always loved the ease of use of ALL of the Mac OS' I remember how amazed I was with Mac OS system 6, and the ability to play CD's on the computer! Wow! :-) The simple truth is that Mac OS is larger than life. It is a cultural icon. And it only keeps getting better.
  14. dmcleer

    Problem remembering startup disk settings

    Well, after a week of futule attempts to get this thing firing up without having to run the disk utility on the Panther install disk, then re-booting to the hard drive system, I believe I have the start-up problem solved. I went over to my friend's studio this afternoon to pick up the original keyboard, mouse, and System restore CDs. As we were talking, he told me all about the Tiger system he had been running on this computer before having sold it to me. One of the things he mentioned was the specs of the hard drive he had been running Tiger on. I hadn't realized before today that he had been running a different hard drive in it than the one he sold to me. So, the thought occurred to me that the hard drive jumper config might be incorrect. Sure enough, this evening, after simply opening the side panel, and pulling out the drive, it only took a quick look at the jumpers and a comparison to the printed chart on the drive face to realize that the jumper was in the "slave" position. I moved it back to the "Master" poition, and away we went. I am going to let the machine sit overnight again, and test it in the morning, but I can't imagine it won't fire right up for me. I hope this silly oversight in my troubleshooting process will help someone down the road. The moral of the story: If you get a new or used hard drive, make sure the jumper is positioned correctly! :-) I banged my head on this problem looking at SCSI cards, RAM config, system software, etc. I think I looked at every possibility before finally figuring out the hard drive jumper config. Oh well, live and learn! Don
  15. dmcleer

    Problem remembering startup disk settings

    Well, after a week of futule attempts to get this thing firing up without having to run the disk utility on the Panther install disk, then re-booting to the hard drive system, I believe I have the start-up problem solved. I went over to my friend's studio this afternoon to pick up the original keyboard, mouse, and System restore CDs. As we were talking, he told me all about the Tiger system he had been running on this computer before having sold it to me. One of the things he mentioned was the specs of the hard drive he had been running Tiger on. I hadn't realized before today that he had been running a different hard drive in it than the one he sold to me. So, the thought occurred to me that the hard drive jumper config might be incorrect. Sure enough, this evening, after simply opening the side panel, and pulling out the drive, it only took a quick look at the jumpers and a comparison to the printed chart on the drive face to realize that the jumper was in the "slave" position. I moved it back to the "Master" poition, and away we went. I am going to let the machine sit overnight again, and test it in the morning, but I can't imagine it won't fire right up for me. I hope this silly oversight in my troubleshooting process will help someone down the road. The moral of the story: If you get a new or used hard drive, make sure the jumper is positioned correctly! :-) I banged my head on this problem looking at SCSI cards, RAM config, system software, etc. I think I looked at every possibility before finally figuring out the hard drive jumper config. Oh well, live and learn! Don
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