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Legolover64

Terminal Guide?

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I'm wondering if anyone knows about a basic guide to Terminal (performing basic functions, etc.) and one that leads up to Network tasks and advanced topics, "hacking" too, if you know of it :P (just kidding).

 

Anyone know of a guide to Terminal?

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I'm wondering if anyone knows about a basic guide to Terminal (performing basic functions, etc.) and one that leads up to Network tasks and advanced topics, "hacking" too, if you know of it :P (just kidding).

 

Anyone know of a guide to Terminal?

 

The terminal guide that you speak of is just typical Unix. You can pick up any number of books on it. There are of course lots of little differences from one dialect to another (Apple uses the Darwin version, then there's linux, AIX, Solaris, etc, etc), but the basics are the same. I'd start with a basic book on working in Unix.

 

Once you know all the basics, then you can start digging into Mac-specific terminal tools. Lots of the big Mac books provide details about Mac-specific terminal options. I've found "Max OS X Unleashed", by John Ray and William C. Ray, to be a pretty good book. I'm sure there are many others.

 

- Tim

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There are a lot of tutorials about the Mac Terminal on-line (basically, Unix for Mac users.) You can Google for them, or start with the one here at OSX FAQ.

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there's a good book called "Mac OS X Unix" which is pretty comprehensive. It was written for 10.2, but since Darwin hasn't changed much if at all since then, you should have no problem learning form it. As a matter of fact, i find the only commands you actually ever will use regularly are:

cd - this changes your directory to path specified

ls - lists the contents of the current directory

mkdir - Makes a new directory in current directory

man [terminal command] - manual pages included in all *nix based systems. just read it

top/top -u - shows processes using the most system resources

kill/kill -[x] - kills process with specified Unix ID numbers

ifconfig/iwconfig - this pair shows you network diagnostics. I haven't actually tried them in OS X, but they work on every other *nix box I've ever tried

 

That's about all I use regularly. Of course there are more comprehensive online guides and obviously books have much better coverage than my little guide here.

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