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chiff

track names

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As far as i can tell, the way that the internet CD databases like gracenote/CDDB work is by looking at track lengths - a good way of seeing this in action is when you put in certain CD singles and have a number of matches come up because there does happen to be more than one entry with the same number of tracks of certain length in a certain order, but obviously the more tracks on the CD, the less likelyhood of it matching up exactly with any other album.

So if the album has been available on CD at any point and the track listing uploaded, then when charlie had finished burning the audio CD and it mounted, it will have automatically checked it and found a matching set of track lengths - hence the correct track names.

 

or if i was explaining this to my four year old son: it's magic. :P

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Yeah, I always just kinda assumed it worked with track times as well. However, I've never put in a Mix CD and had the wrong track set show up. In fact, I think only once in my 4 or 5 years (whatever it is) of using iTunes, I've only had the wrong track names appear as an option once, and the other option was the correct track listing, so it wasn't even a problem.

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I make CD's every week from my radio programs. One, in particular, is always the same length. Each and every week I stick the finished CD in the drive, iTunes opens, and it says the name of the track is Chocolate Salty Balls or something to that effect. Definitely looks at the number of tracks and the length of each when deciding what an unlabeled CD might contain.

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yea, thats how CDDB works...it checks the track lengths and if the lengths are exactly correct...then you get a CD with the album/song/artist info..

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But in this case Charlie said that he had "copied it into his mac as one big audio file" and then "chopped it off into individual tracks". Isn't it a weird coincedence that he happen to cut them off at exactly the same length of those on cd? Seems highly unlikely.

 

I'm just curious as to what he used, for software, to "copy it into his mac as one big audio file".

 

Tony

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Isn't it a weird coincedence that he happen to cut them off at exactly the same length of those on cd? Seems highly unlikely.

 

Yeah, that's what I thought, but I just figured that CDDB was smart enough to give each song a couple seconds of margin. I still bet the chances are slim that a CD would have the same combination of times, even with the margin.

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I'm for the conspiracy theory. And did I mention I'm an X-phile?

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I'm for the conspiracy theory. And did I mention I'm an X-phile?

 

Hey, it's all coming together now. I guess its not Apple or Adam the MacCaster taking over our lives... its CDDB.

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From my understanding, CDDB uses a combination of the # of tracks, each individual track length and the total length of the CD (album) to create "fingerprints" for each. This allows brings down the possibility of confusing two CDs exponentially... as long as the listener cut each track at the exact point and didnt add anything to the overall length of CD, it should be found correctly by CDDB.

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red5230,

And I thought it was the CSM (Cigarette Smoking Man). :)

 

Tony

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Isn't it a weird coincedence that he happen to cut them off at exactly the same length of those on cd? Seems highly unlikely.

 

Yeah, that's what I thought, but I just figured that CDDB was smart enough to give each song a couple seconds of margin. I still bet the chances are slim that a CD would have the same combination of times, even with the margin.

 

There have been times where (for some reason or another) I have had albums on DAT or MiniDisc, recorded them into PEAK as one audio file, then chopped up the songs, then burned the album. The CDDB always recognizes the albums when I do this process. As stated above, there must be a few seconds of margin given by the CDDB. Nothing Twilight Zone here, and nothing new. I first encountered this about three or four years ago. But, yeah, I do remember that "whoa" feeling the first time it happened to me.

 

Aaron

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iTunes will remember, locally probably, your CDs that you burn. I create my own mixes, name the tracks, burn a CD, then whenever I put the CD in later, it remembers the tracks. It probably just keeps a local file that it looks up in addition to the GraceNote lookup over the 'net.

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I do remember that "whoa" feeling the first time it happened to me.

 

Definitely spooky the first time that happens (only once to me, so far). The LP I had transferred to CD was a BBC Sound Effects Record, and had 66 tracks, so the database probably didn't have that much to choose from....

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That's CD-Text. It's an enhanced Audio CD format that's backwards compatible. A friend of mine has a car CD player with this feature. No internet or CDDB necessary.

 

update: oh, nevermind. I jusr re-listened to the show and it can't be CD-Text because the titles weren't manually typed in.

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This Is Charlie, the Reverb guy in Springfield. Hey, thanks everyone for the great posts. Now if I had gotten "Chocolate Salty Balls" on a Merle Haggard song, I would move from the Twilight Zone to South Park!

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I consistently experience the problem Charlie described.

 

I record my churches sermons onto my Mac mini using a FastTrack USB audio interface (http://www.m-audio.com/products/en_us/FastTrackUSB-main.html) using an application called CD Spin Doctor 2 from Deep Sea Software. I create an aiff file that gives me a right channel only audio file. Then I use Quicktime to export myself a mono file.

 

I then take the file into Toast 6 Titanium and create my CD. All is well until I put the finished CD comes up on the desktop of my Mac Mini with a disc name like "Blues Blues Blues" or some other name, clearly drawn from a database.

 

I'd love to know the workaround for this.

 

A guy at the Apple store recommended I instead use Garage Band to record the initial recording and then use iTunes to make a final CD. This method works flawlessly. As far as I can tell, this is how I will do it from now on. It also gives me wide variety of compression, echo, etc.

 

The curious part of me though would still like to know how to do it using Toast.

 

Thanks for such an awesome resource to Mac lovers. The show and forum are awesome.

 

Jeff

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