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ipodman

09F911029D74E35BD84156C5635688C0

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wow, that was the biggest thing i've ever seen on digg, almost every story on the front page right now is about this. it even got more diggs than the iPhone. I think they took the big story down after they got a letter. I heard it got over 50 000 diggs. :) There was a huge revolt and after they took down one of the stories everyone went mad, then they stopped pulling them down

 

09F911029D74E35BD84156C5635688C0

 

http://www.secondpagemedia.com/confundo/in...ost&id=7438

http://blog.digg.com/?p=74

http://www.secondpagemedia.com/confundo/in...ost&id=7437

http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=480752301&size=o

http://www.stanleyshilov.com/blog/09-f9-11...-c5-63-56-88-c0

http://digg.com/programming/Digg_For_Freed..._C5_63_56_88_C0

http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,21659333-2,00.html - wow, even the australian news picked it up, they dont usually pick up anything good like this

Edited by ipodman

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stand up for our freedom of speech

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I wonder how much of a shock this has really caused? Did all "Diggers" truly believe that Kevin Rose was "just like us".

 

I think we are seeing the end of the mighty Digg, and the recent statement by Kevin Rose will only fan the flames.

 

For free speech to flourish unfettered and uncensored means any funding should come from the users and not sponsors.

 

Digg has Dugg its grave

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I wonder how much of a shock this has really caused? Did all "Diggers" truly believe that Kevin Rose was "just like us".

 

I think we are seeing the end of the mighty Digg, and the recent statement by Kevin Rose will only fan the flames.

 

For free speech to flourish unfettered and uncensored means any funding should come from the users and not sponsors.

 

Digg has Dugg its grave

I think that is just crazy. I saw it in a few postings around the net. What do you expect? They are a business and they are trying to protect their business interests. They got a cease and desist so they followed it. Then when their users went crazy over it [rightly so] they listened to their users and switched their stance. Sounds like just about a perfect response to me. If no one had cared then it would not have been worth defying the cease and desist since the users cared they are accepting the battle.

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I think that is just crazy. I saw it in a few postings around the net. What do you expect? They are a business and they are trying to protect their business interests. They got a cease and desist so they followed it. Then when their users went crazy over it [rightly so] they listened to their users and switched their stance. Sounds like just about a perfect response to me. If no one had cared then it would not have been worth defying the cease and desist since the users cared they are accepting the battle.

 

 

It will be very interesting to see the next Diggnation, its such a slap in the face for the thousands of users.

 

The issue for me is the Kevin Rose attitude of "rise up and speak your mind" its a pretence and for me that came across with the first sponsor advert that was posted on Digg.

 

Yes its a Business but its pretending to be non biased and "free" thats BS, you cant have your cake and eat it.

Edited by zionlion

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It will be very interesting to see the next Diggnation, its such a slap in the face for the thousands of users.

 

The issue for me is the Kevin Rose attitude of "rise up and speak your mind" its a pretence and for me that came across with the first sponsor advert that was posted on Digg.

 

Yes its a Business but its pretending to be non biased and "free" thats BS, you cant have your cake and eat it.

I don't see how it is being biased to listen to a cease and desist. I am also very interested to see the next diggnation though.

Edited by joshr

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Wow you miss a day of checking Digg and the electronic universe implodes!

 

This could be interesting, although I think the repercussions will take some time to play out.

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The code can be found all over the place without digg, and after all digg didnt host the actual article, so how could they prosecute?

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It was a silly decision, followed by an ever sillier statement from Kevin Rose "If we lose, then what the hell, at least we died trying".

 

Upshot for me, was that I started looking at other sites and I'm liking Reddit.

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The code can be found all over the place without digg, and after all digg didnt host the actual article, so how could they prosecute?

It's a sticky legal mess. They may in the end lose, it's kind of a gray zone. The problem is the DMCA is a very broadly/badly written law which can go any number of ways. The MPAA tried to strongarm sites such as google and digg which aggregate links for even having links to the content because it could be said that having a link to the content might be considered to fall under the category of giving instruction on how to circumvent copywrite which is illegal under the DMCA. I think digg just didn't want to deal with it. What was googles response initially?

 

EDIT: This answers that question. http://blog.wired.com/business/2007/05/google_wordpres.html

Edited by joshr

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Im sorry for not knowing this but what is it and why is it such big news?

It's the code required to break the encryption on HD DVD movies. Basically as I understand it it's the "key" that will let software be made to rip HD DVD discs to a hard drive. You still need a HD DVD player to do anything and the files are huge so impractical to upload/download so it's not really that big of a deal. The reason it's a big deal has to do with a couple of things not so related to the technical nature of what was accomplished. First of all everyone hates the MPAA so the moment this was out it was posted on thousands of site as a big FU. The other thing that happened is the company that is responsible for this code sent cease and desist letters to sites which aggregate links and news to try and get the links buried. The last thing which is getting a lot of coverage on the net is that digg.com, who has a loyal subculture of people who care about this kind of stuff, initially followed the cease and desist and tried to bury the links being posted.

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But if people from outside the US were to put it on a non-US server, the DMCA wouldn't apply and the MPAA wouldn't have any jurisdiction, would it?

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But if people from outside the US were to put it on a non-US server, the DMCA wouldn't apply and the MPAA wouldn't have any jurisdiction, would it?
Hell they can put it on my server ;-)

 

The issue for me was this, Kevin Rose posted the story and after the cease and desist took it down. Yes this is prudent practice providing you are not promoting a site that is primarily focused around free speech.

 

Digg has lost its credibility for 1, taking the story down 2, putting it back up and using a lame statement as some kind of spin.

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Wasn't Kevin Rose the guy who needs to get drunk with his buddy to create a podcast ranting away about essentially nothing? Well, at least, he seems to have some decency. Here in The Netherlands, there is a blog called ReteCool, that is also about free speech, or, better phrased, the right to insult and bully anyone and everything with words: politicians, the mentally challenged, religious people. If they can find a way to hurt someone with words, they will do it. The blog is quite popular, because it is so controversial.

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Kevin Rose is the guy who does the podcast with Alex Albrecht called diggnation, which you are referring to. He used to work at TechTV until it was bout by comcast and became garbage. Then he went on and started Digg.com and Revision3.

 

The reason they went after the aggregators is precisely because if the site was hosted outside the US the DMCA doesn't apply. However the DMCA would apply to Digg and Google and such who are US companies.

 

Digg is not really about free speech as I see it. It's about crowdsourcing and what it can do. Besides they already ban anything illegal or pornographic so as I said before I don't see what changed. In fact if anything they went against their terms of service by not blocking further posts [open to your interpretation of the DMCA].

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