Jump to content
joshr

DRM Free Music Hits

Recommended Posts

I just went to the apple page and the main page says "introducing itunes plus" "preview and purchase high quality DRM-free music." Awesome!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for some reason, one of my upgrade songs wont download. and the other was really slow. (i only got two plus songs). my soul II soul wont download. error 504.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
for some reason, one of my upgrade songs wont download. and the other was really slow. (i only got two plus songs). my soul II soul wont download. error 504.

 

Yeah my downloads are a bit slow as well. I'll hazard a guess that the iTunes music downloading servers are in heavy use at the moment with the release of their DRM free music.

 

Oh and I just got an error 504 as well... dang...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll just wait for a week or so. Those DRM-free songs aren't going anywhere, are they? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone find a way to upgrade only SOME of your music? I have an album I would like to upgrade, but I don't really care to upgrade a bunch of other songs that are eligible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday I downloaded itunes 7.2 although there was no itunes plus music, i've upgraded a couple of songs and they sound great. Also if ur going to pirate these files, they still have your name embedded into the aac file (http://www.tuaw.com/2007/05/30/tuaw-tip-dont-torrent-that-song/) although it isn't drm, it's just that you know it's your song, it doesn't restrict you in any way. so just don't pirate these songs because it's illegal and it will prove to other record companies that it does work. everyone boycot them so they all come to drm free.

 

I hate how it's an extra 50 cents in australia, it should be 40 cents.

 

It's pretty cool of apple cuz microsoft just announced that touching table thing which is like multi-touch table thing that bill gaytes was showing off, it's funny cuz apple was probably waiting until microsoft did sumthin, so that they could release the itunes plus plus the new Youtube AppleTV and a 160GB version, which will be the pimpest selling point for it. soz iluvappletoday.

Edited by ipodman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ahh double post. someone delete this.

Edited by ipodman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will always be people who share bought music, just as there are people who steal and rob when there's an opportunity to do so. Luckily, that is a minority of the population. Most people have learned from their parents that stealing is wrong. The only point is, what is stealing?

 

For example, what if you wanted to use your downloaded DRM-free songs on an iPod party, and give it just one spin? Is that stealing, or promotion? I believe people get to know new artists and buy their songs through such parties.

 

I guess as long as you don't copy your files from your iPod, via a computer, to another iPod, it is alright, isn't it? The temptation to put it on a computer in an iTunes playlist is rather big, especially if there is no DRM to prevent it. The intent is not stealing, but letting your friends listen to your favorite playlist on their own iPod.

 

I guess the next step is to allow people to share songs by streaming from one iPod to another, so this kind of swapping of files isn't necessary. The Apple TV has this feature, so why not the next gen iPod? You can already do this with one of your friends, with a Y-splitting cable, but what if you wanted to share with three or four friends at the same time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

waiting for the new white stripes album. it better be DRM free on release date.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you guys heard that embedded within the songs with no drm are your email and name, so if you decide to upload it to a peer to peer sight they know exactly who did it. So why have DRM originally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you guys heard that embedded within the songs with no drm are your email and name, so if you decide to upload it to a peer to peer sight they know exactly who did it. So why have DRM originally?

I did not know that until I saw the posts about it here. Brilliant!!

 

Most people have learned from their parents that stealing is wrong. The only point is, what is stealing?

To me giving it to my friends is not stealing and what I would do with a CD, Tape, Laserdisc [really?], whatever media form it is. The line as I see it is uploading it for people you don't know. Plus with your name and email imbedded in the file there is good reason to be very selective about who you give it to.

Edited by joshr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you guys heard that embedded within the songs with no drm are your email and name, so if you decide to upload it to a peer to peer sight they know exactly who did it. So why have DRM originally?

 

Yeah, just read about that, it does make DRM look a little lame.

 

Although I'm guessing you can probably erase the info with a hex editor, it'll certainly catch the unwary. I also wonder if they're using more subtle watermarking, to identify files. Either way, lock down DRM now seems a very crude method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To me giving it to my friends is not stealing and what I would do with a CD, Tape, Laserdisc [really?], whatever media form it is. The line as I see it is uploading it for people you don't know. Plus with your name and email imbedded in the file there is good reason to be very selective about who you give it to.

 

Agree with that, it brings us back to when we had physical music media and sharing amongst friends was no big deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most people have learned from their parents that stealing is wrong.

 

Our parents also taught us that it was good to share. i wonder if that means file sharing as well.

 

about the embedding of your name and address in the aac files. You can easily rip it out of the file. or you can convert it to a different format in iTunes and then it would be gone, apple lossless would be best for that because it's lossless exept for your name and info in the file.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
about the embedding of your name and address in the aac files. You can easily rip it out of the file. or you can convert it to a different format in iTunes and then it would be gone, apple lossless would be best for that because it's lossless exept for your name and info in the file.

If Apple puts in some secret information in the aac files they sold you, what's to prevent them to propagate this info into other formats if you are using iTunes (or any other Apple software) for the conversion? I wouldn't use iTunes for that, but rather a third-party app instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this isn't anything "secret", it's not encrypted at all, it's just like an id3 tag although it's your name. It isn't going to phone home to apple or anything, it's nothing.

 

Update: how to remove the info.

1. Open the track in QuickTime Pro Player.

2. Go to Window, then "Show Movie Properties".

3. Click on the "Soundtrack". Now, click "Extract".

4. Export this, choose "Movie to MPEG-4", click "Options".

5. Now, go to the Audio tab and choose "Pass Through".

6. Click "OK", name your new file, then click "Save".

 

not my info. found it sumwhere.

Edited by ipodman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It isn't going to phone home to apple or anything, it's nothing.

I guess you're right about that (although you never know, remember the Sony rootkit), but I think there's more data in the file than just the string containing your name, because there could be several users with the same name. The account information seems to be more likely as a hidden part in the aac file.

 

Anyway, many people are thinking that sharing via p2p is just criminal, but the music industry is just as anal about casual sharing among friends, so they made that illegal as well. In principle, you are only allowed to play music you bought through official channels. You even aren't allowed to sell your music, even if you don't keep copies of the original. You own the right to listen to your copy of an audio file. You do not own the right to resell or redistribute, or even to give away your audio files for free. The scale at which you do this (only friends or peer-to-peer networks) doesn't really matter for it being illegal.

 

It's like The Unofficial Apple Weblog states:

Bottom line: DRM-free doesn't mean that Apple suddenly supports piracy.

Or in my words: Simple because you can, doesn't mean you should.

Edited by Ignoracious

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess you're right about that (although you never know, remember the Sony rootkit), but I think there's more data in the file than just the string containing your name, because there could be several users with the same name. The account information seems to be more likely as a hidden part in the aac file.

Agreed. I doubt that it's terribly hard to strip the file of any info about yourself but I would also suspect there is more to it than just the obvious.

 

Anyway, many people are thinking that sharing via p2p is just criminal, but the music industry is just as anal about casual sharing among friends, so they made that illegal as well. In principle, you are only allowed to play music you bought through official channels. You even aren't allowed to sell your music, even if you don't keep copies of the original. You own the right to listen to your copy of an audio file. You do not own the right to resell or redistribute, or even to give away your audio files for free. The scale at which you do this (only friends or peer-to-peer networks) doesn't really matter for it being illegal.

 

It's like The Unofficial Apple Weblog states:

 

Or in my words: Simple because you can, doesn't mean you should.

This logic confounds me. This is the same logic that says "it's a law therefor it must be right." Wrong!! Law makers are just people and they have a lot to be experts about. They are not all tech experts and when a industry with big money comes in confounds them with technical details and sells a little snake oil they often buy into it. That does not mean the law is right. I don't care what the law is. I care what the moral thing to do is. It's not moral to take someone's art and make it freely available to the world unless they specifically authorize that. It is moral to lend your friend a CD and tell them to check it out because it's great. It's very likely that they will either dislike it and delete it causing no harm to anyone or like it and buy more music from the same artist thereby providing a fan that the band would not have otherwise had. I for one don't let anyone and especially not a corporate consortium set my moral compass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, do whatever you think is right, only don't get caught in the act. That seems to be what everyone else is doing. Boy, that sounds so cynical !!

 

I'm curious what EMI expects to get out of this, because I don't think they do it simply because their customers (that would be us) want no copy restrictions. I suspect they want to grab a bigger piece of the online market place before other companies go DRM free.

 

In hindsight, the record companies should have struck a deal with Kazaa when they had the chance. Then they would have been in a much better position and have had the support of their customers, instead of using the RIAA and its sisters organizations to sue their potential customers.

 

I guess Universal, Sony BMG, Warner and EMI have to do much better to win back the trust of both their artists and customers. Making songs DRM free is certainly not enough. They keep sitting on their back catalogs, or, as Adam Curry is saying The Sound Track of Our Lives. And don't forget, the big four are still indirectly trying to kill Internet streaming radio (and terrestrial radio as well, if they could) by being greedy. As if they aren't rich enough already.

 

So going DRM free is just a baby step in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, do whatever you think is right, only don't get caught in the act. That seems to be what everyone else is doing. Boy, that sounds so cynical !!

 

I'm curious what EMI expects to get out of this, because I don't think they do it simply because their customers (that would be us) want no copy restrictions. I suspect they want to grab a bigger piece of the online market place before other companies go DRM free.

 

In hindsight, the record companies should have struck a deal with Kazaa when they had the chance. Then they would have been in a much better position and have had the support of their customers, instead of using the RIAA and its sisters organizations to sue their potential customers.

 

I guess Universal, Sony BMG, Warner and EMI have to do much better to win back the trust of both their artists and customers. Making songs DRM free is certainly not enough. They keep sitting on their back catalogs, or, as Adam Curry is saying The Sound Track of Our Lives. And don't forget, the big four are still indirectly trying to kill Internet streaming radio (and terrestrial radio as well, if they could) by being greedy. As if they aren't rich enough already.

 

So going DRM free is just a baby step in the right direction.

I would say EMI is trying to gain brand awareness and market share. Essentially the customer doesn't care who the record company is. No one says ooohhhh I love the sony music catalog so I am going to buy that new CD because it's from sony. EMI is turning that all on it's ear. By being the only one to offer high quality DRM free music I suddenly want to know every artist in the EMI catalog. I actually care now what EMI makes and would be more inclined to buy from EMI. It's also potentially good because by being so restrictive the RIAA has left everyone very unhappy. We all want something else and now that someone is offering it we are going to buy it. It's exactly the same thing that is going on with the iphone. Most people hate their cell phones so much that when apple releases vaporware people are willing to jump ship sight unseen because they are so unhappy with their current situation that the mere possibility of something different is very attractive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only a single song that I've bought will upgrade. The rest are aparently not EMI or are stupid. I can upgrade only one Gorillaz song that I've bought-- not other Gorillaz songs or any other artist seem to be upgradeable. I want Nirvana Plus! Not too many of my favorite bands are EMI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Only a single song that I've bought will upgrade. The rest are aparently not EMI or are stupid. I can upgrade only one Gorillaz song that I've bought-- not other Gorillaz songs or any other artist seem to be upgradeable. I want Nirvana Plus! Not too many of my favorite bands are EMI.

Sorry to hear that maybe your musical taste needs to shift a little :).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, if you're smart, you write an e-mail to the artist or record label, asking them to offer the songs you like in iTunes as high quality DRM-free songs. If enough fans do that, perhaps this will speed things up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Of course, if you're smart, you write an e-mail to the artist or record label, asking them to offer the songs you like in iTunes as high quality DRM-free songs. If enough fans do that, perhaps this will speed things up.

Probably not but definitely worth a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it might work for the smaller indie labels, not part of Sony BMG, Universal or Warner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

×