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cassiope

what NEW feature of Leopard is the trigger?

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Hi All,

 

interesting question: what feature is the most impressive one to have made you decide to buy Leopard, or what is the feature that's making it a must have product?

 

I am interested in the answers.

 

For me on a mac pro it definitely would be the full 64 bit support, else apart from eye-candy not that much.

 

Rob

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idk, nothing in Leopard is like making me give it the "wow" factor. I am look forward to Time Machine, just because it seems to be a backup product that I actually will have on a schedule and not be an annoyance to me.

 

Leopard doesn't seem to be one of those "big OS X" releases. There is nothing really groundbreaking.

 

Probably the next "exposé" for me will be Quicklook. It will be one of those things you can't live without, and just take it for granite.

 

I really hope they don't try and push things that are just "fluff", templates in Mail (I don't even use Mail) are not convincing or "amazing".

 

I really really wish that they (I am pretty sure they didn't, as no one is reporting it) would improve things like Inkwell. Vista's handwriting recognition is far better, personally.

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well i'm really excited about stacks. Quick look and cover flow or gonna be awesome too... that an the new widget creators.. there is a lot of stuff i'm excited about :D

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i'm probably more excited about little things that you wont notice for a while. like extra spotlight search commands, editing pdf's in preview.. just a lot of little things. oh and being able to sync notes with my iphone through mail. i could care less about mail's stationery feature. but the rss and notes might be nice.

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There's not one feature that wows me in Leopard.

 

Time Machine might be indespensible, but I'll have to wait and see how it works.

 

Stacks seem interesting but not worth $130 on their own.

 

CoverFlow in Finder could prove to be either very useful or highly annoying.

 

I could care less about the iChat backgrounds and stationary in Mail.

 

One thing that turns me off is the new Doc and Menu Bar. I'm really not looking forward to staring at those all day.

 

I'm getting Leopard for what I'm hoping is a promise of little refinements that wind up being huge benefits. What those are, I'm just not sure of. I just wish there was something to be really excited about in Leopard.

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So far only ONE of you responded with: the little things under the hood.

 

Nobody having expectations about performance and stability improvements, security improvements?

Speaking for myself the 64-bit is a feature hidden under the hood but on a MAC PRO that feature might be fully used since the Xeon processor in inside/out - fully 64 bit, contrary to all other processors used in MACs. (at least until now)

 

Note: all MACs have 64 data-bit ports but no processing on 64 bits, only the Xeon have both a processor fully utilising 64 bits as well as a 64 bit data-port.

 

cheers

 

Rob

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There are so many things on that list that just really shouldn't be counted as a new "feature". It scares me when they consider screen savers new features. I also hate that they consider one (1) (uno) new feature as five separate things. Spaces for example. I'm sorry, but counting "add or remove spaces" as a feature seems a little cheap.

 

Empty the trash button. While I'm sure that is nice and all, it shouldn't be considered an actual feature. That is more like a software update.

 

Time Machine is interesting. It apparently has 11 new features, and it hasn't even been released before.

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Oddly, I'm most interested in the changes to Mail.

 

I like the coming integration with iCal and Address book.

 

And I'm really looking forward to the notes and to do functions, which makes a lot of sense in an email app. I think I'm more likely to use todos in Mail than in iCal. I don't use the todo function in iCal. It seems clunky.

 

I think it's interesting that Mail will now work as an RSS reader, but I'm not sure I'll use this function. I don't really care about the mail stationary, but it might be fun for a while.

 

I find Backup works really well for me, so I'm not sure how Time Machine will be a benefit unless it has a significantly improved compression algorithm.

 

I do like the idea of being able to view my documents in Coverflow before opening them. As a teacher I have several similarly named documents, so it will be nice to see them before opening. Some files I only use once a year, so remembering my naming scheme from year to year gets to be a pain.

 

To reiterate, MAIL is the update for which I'm most excited.

 

-Rob

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How about the new security level with randomized RAM chumps making it more or less impossible to use a buffer overflow?

 

I agree when I use funny glasses any new feature counts double and it is very cheap to say 11 new features in time machine - SCUZE ME, did we see TM before??

Mail and iCal integration seems somewhat overdue - there still is no group-sharing possible which would make it somewhat more a real product.

workgroups still are under valuated in Leopard though from what I know the server side is more and better served.

 

Rob

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Spaces and quick look are the ones for me. Wouldn't have paid £85 for it though. £58 is enough...

Edited by Graham

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Spaces and quick look are the ones for me. Wouldn't have paid £85 for it though. £58 is enough...

if not overpaid :lol:

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So far only ONE of you responded with: the little things under the hood.

 

Nobody having expectations about performance and stability improvements, security improvements?

Speaking for myself the 64-bit is a feature hidden under the hood but on a MAC PRO that feature might be fully used since the Xeon processor in inside/out - fully 64 bit, contrary to all other processors used in MACs. (at least until now)

 

Note: all MACs have 64 data-bit ports but no processing on 64 bits, only the Xeon have both a processor fully utilising 64 bits as well as a 64 bit data-port.

 

cheers

 

Rob

 

TimeMachine, the new Finder and better performace is for me the trigger

I look also forward to the new applications coming from developers using the new things under the hood.

 

@cassiope

 

your telling me my Code2Duo imac cannot run 64 bit applications?

Or what does this actually mean?

 

While your answering could you explain what Paulthurrott is saying here

 

 

"1. 64-bit application support

 

Thanks to the 64-bit Xeon chip that will be shipping in the new Mac Pro systems, Leopard will be fully 64-bit enabled (unlike Tiger, which is only partially 64-bit and then only on certain Power PC systems). That means that OS X will finally do what Windows XP x64 Edition did last year: Run 32-bit and 64-bit applications natively, side-by-side. Good for them."

 

Its at http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/macos...ard_preview.asp

 

Does Windows XP 64 run 32 bit applications?

I thought Windows cannot do that?

Thats the reason why most people run the 32 bit version?!

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TimeMachine, the new Finder and better performace is for me the trigger

I look also forward to the new applications coming from developers using the new things under the hood.

 

@cassiope

 

your telling me my Code2Duo imac cannot run 64 bit applications?

Or what does this actually mean?

 

While your answering could you explain what Paulthurrott is saying here

"1. 64-bit application support

 

Thanks to the 64-bit Xeon chip that will be shipping in the new Mac Pro systems, Leopard will be fully 64-bit enabled (unlike Tiger, which is only partially 64-bit and then only on certain Power PC systems). That means that OS X will finally do what Windows XP x64 Edition did last year: Run 32-bit and 64-bit applications natively, side-by-side. Good for them."

 

Its at http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/macos...ard_preview.asp

 

Does Windows XP 64 run 32 bit applications?

 

You are right Thorsten

windows 64 bit MUST have 64 bit processors (internally and externally == CPU processor space and memory space) and they will NOT run 32 bit programs.

Since intel cpu's were intro'd the mac is and was capable to use 64 bit datapaths and addressing space. That was fully unleashed in tiger.

BUT Tiger didn't support 64 bit processors, they fed the 64 bit processors with 32 bit commands. Leopard will allow 64 bit address space (memory) thats 2^64 of addresses that are available (is about 18 exa bite=18000 peta bite) the big change however will be full 64 bit processors, now ONLY in the mac pro. the programs will support 64 bit CPS's meaning the processor space (command space) is doubled - allowing faster throughput of commands and processing of commands and collaboration between memory and cpu will be faster. So the best improvement you will see is most likely to be seen on a mac pro.

To make things clear all other mac's right now are 64 bit address memory space and 32 bit processor space.

The PPC was however 64 bit internal and external. It was never completely used, mainly because there are no or hardly no 64 bit programs in the consumer market.

64 bit programs can be found in the academic market running directly on unix/free BSD. The majority math oriented.

So far as far as I know windows 64 bit is incapable to run 32/64 bit side by side natively, they have to emulate one of the two platforms - slowing down tremendously.

 

OS X 10.5 will however support native support for BOTH 32 AND 64 bit apps SIMULTANEOUSLY, and that is rather WOW. The problem is: who knows what is 64 bit and what is not.

 

I hope this answers your question Thorsten.

 

cheers,

 

Rob

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You are right Thorsten

windows 64 bit MUST have 64 bit processors (internally and externally == CPU processor space and memory space) and they will NOT run 32 bit programs.

Since intel cpu's were intro'd the mac is and was capable to use 64 bit datapaths and addressing space. That was fully unleashed in tiger.

BUT Tiger didn't support 64 bit processors, they fed the 64 bit processors with 32 bit commands. Leopard will allow 64 bit address space (memory) thats 2^64 of addresses that are available (is about 18 exa bite=18000 peta bite) the big change however will be full 64 bit processors, now ONLY in the mac pro. the programs will support 64 bit CPS's meaning the processor space (command space) is doubled - allowing faster throughput of commands and processing of commands and collaboration between memory and cpu will be faster. So the best improvement you will see is most likely to be seen on a mac pro.

To make things clear all other mac's right now are 64 bit address memory space and 32 bit processor space.

The PPC was however 64 bit internal and external. It was never completely used, mainly because there are no or hardly no 64 bit programs in the consumer market.

64 bit programs can be found in the academic market running directly on unix/free BSD. The majority math oriented.

So far as far as I know windows 64 bit is incapable to run 32/64 bit side by side natively, they have to emulate one of the two platforms - slowing down tremendously.

 

OS X 10.5 will however support native support for BOTH 32 AND 64 bit apps SIMULTANEOUSLY, and that is rather WOW. The problem is: who knows what is 64 bit and what is not.

 

I hope this answers your question Thorsten.

 

cheers,

 

Rob

 

Ah now I understand thanks a lot.

But Paul Thurrott while being usually well informed and talking quite sense everything windows and Mac on the Windows Weekly podcast, what he writes sometimes does not make sense. He should really do some more research especially when he talks about Windows you would think he knows what he is talking about.

 

"hat means that OS X will finally do what Windows XP x64 Edition did last year: Run 32-bit and 64-bit applications natively, side-by-side. Good for them." (Paul Thurrott)

 

And this is just not true 32-bit and 64-bit, applications do NOT run natively side by side

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wow, i just noticed this in the 300 list: live partition resizing in disk utility. very nice. i'll be using that.

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I'll upgrade because of all of those little things combined. Sure none of them alone would be enough to upgrade, but there are so many little things. Has anyone seen the new network preference pane? It's pretty sweet.

 

On a related note how long until someone hacks the menubar to look like the old one? I think the translucency looks ridiculous.

 

-Tom

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I've liked the new menu bar. I forgot my favourite new feature: the kickass api's that are available to developers. Even your existing applications might have some new features (iStat menus to name one).

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I think the "back to my Mac" feature is going to be pretty awesome. Andy Ihnatko says that feature is easily worth $89 by itself.

 

Time machine is a biggy for me, as is spaces.

 

Really, a lot of the new stuff looks pretty good to me: movable Safari tabs, tabbed terminal windows, the PDF manipulation in Preview, etc. Lots of "wow" factor there for me.

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the improved finder.

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Several for me (even though I'm not upgrading right away - it will be two weeks or so)

 

Quick look - I have a few hundred PDF's. A fast way to look in them to make sure I've got the right one is a *good* thing.

Spotlight improvements - I use spotlight all the time.

Spaces

Equal or better speed on my 12 inch powerbook G4 (1.5 ghtz, 1.25 gig ram)

Faster speed in Safari

Ical improvements (I use it moderatly)

Greater security

 

Quick look and spotlight improvements alone are enough for me, actually. The rest is icing on the cake.

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