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kineticlegend

Tips and Tricks in Leopard

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So I thought I'd start a thread compiling all of the tips and tricks we leopard users have found while using the new system. Add yours here as well!

 

Tips and Tricks:

 

1). When you have Spaces enabled, you can drag windows from one space to another by dragging the window to the side of your screen and then while still holding the window, move your mouse all of the way over to the very edge of the screen. Wait a few seconds, and leopard should switch to the space corresponding to the edge and take your window to the new space. It gives you the true feeling of having an extended desktop, that is unseen off your monitor!

 

2). When you click on a stack, you can choose an item using the arrow keys, or type in the first few characters in the name of the file you want to choose and it will automatically select it!

 

3). You can combine several PDFs by opening up the first pdf in Preview, and then drag the rest of the pdfs from your Finder into the current pdf Preview window. Then save.

 

4). You can change the wall paper for your login screen by replacing the /System/Library/CoreServices/DefaultDesktop.jpg with your own jpg image. Just make sure that you save a copy of the old one in case you need to revert to it, and title the new file as DefaultDesktop.jpg. Then run Repair Permissions in Disk Utility.

 

I'm sure there's more, but that's about all I can think of at the moment.

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wow those are cool, i wouldnt have thought to try those, but they make sense. thanks.

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Awesome tips, especially the Spaces info. Thanks bunch!

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So I thought I'd start a thread compiling all of the tips and tricks we leopard users have found while using the new system. Add yours here as well!

 

Tips and Tricks:

 

1). When you have Spaces enabled, you can drag windows from one space to another by dragging the window to the side of your screen and then while still holding the window, move your mouse all of the way over to the very edge of the screen. Wait a few seconds, and leopard should switch to the space corresponding to the edge and take your window to the new space. It gives you the true feeling of having an extended desktop, that is unseen off your monitor!

I use that all of the time to, so since right now i have this small 13.3 inch macbook screen, its like a whole other monitor next to it.

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(Time for some blatant self promotion here) You can change the dock from the "shelf" look to something a lot less distracting and nicer looking in my opinion by sticking the following lines in the terminal (at detailed in the video on my blog):

 

defaults write com.apple.dock no-glass -boolean YES
killall Dock

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Found this by accident. Selecting a file in the finder and pressing "command Y" will open up a window with a preview of the files contents without actually launching the program or having to switch to coverflow view.

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Pushing the spacebar does the same thing. Good old quicklook.

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For those who want their Dock gone from view:

  • play a movie file in iTunes full screen
  • push the menu button on the Apple remote twice (to enter and exit Front Row)

Push it twice again to let the Dock reappear. I'm sure this is an iTunes/Front Row bug, but it can be used to disable the Dock.

 

BTW The dock isn't hidden (read: isn't pushed aside), it is rendered invisible. This probably means there is a way to do this with a Terminal command. I'm guessing it is put behind the background image layer by iTunes in Full Screen mode, and by using Front Row to exit the iTunes Full Screen mode, instead of with iTunes itself, the Dock stays behind the background image layer.

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u can make that your bottom left corner of the screen is set for spaces (any corner, it doesnt matter). then just drag the window to the corner and it will go to another space! :lol:

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If you have an application that's running a process and REFUSES to be moved/minimized and is getting annoying (such as Switch when converting audio), you can move it by triggering the Spaces display and dragging it from there. Works every time!

 

To download a file that Safari doesn't want to let you download (such as a movie file, etc.) or any file for that matter, go into Terminal and use the ftp command. (ftp http://www.etc.com/example.mov)

 

Any switchers find it annoying that you can't open a folder/file with the Enter key? Command-Up is up, and Command-Down drills down into folders or opens files. (There's also a little hack to make the enter key open folders/files, but I can't remember what it was)

 

Need to hide a folder but still leave it accessible to programs and have it easy to get to through the Finder? Make sure Developer Tools are installed, then in the terminal use the SetFile command (SetFile -a V ... will make whatever is in place of ... invisible, but you can use the Go To Folder command (Shift-Command-G) to open it in the Finder.

 

You can use Quartz Composer files as screensavers - just drag and drop them into /Library/Screen Savers

Edited by macfan777

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Any switchers find it annoying that you can't open a folder/file with the Enter key? Command-Up is up, and Command-Down drills down into folders or opens files. (There's also a little hack to make the enter key open folders/files, but I can't remember what it was)

Command-O works. Of course, opening a folder in column view is sort of a no-op.

 

Need to hide a folder but still leave it accessible to programs and have it easy to get to through the Finder? Make sure Developer Tools are installed, then in the terminal use the SetFile command (SetFile -a V ... will make whatever is in place of ... invisible, but you can use the Go To Folder command (Shift-Command-G) to open it in the Finder.

If you're on Leopard and don't have the Developer Tools installed (or even if you do), you can do the same thing with chflags hidden file... . You make it visible again with chflags nohidden file... . This sets/resets the same flag that SetFile -a V file or SetFile -a v file sets/resets, so you can use them interchangeably. But don't bother to do a man chflags. The man page doesn't mention the hidden flag, probably because the flag does not reside in the same place as the other flags that chflags controls, and only the Leopard version of chglags knows about it.

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