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Cygnus

08.03.2005 - Converting Tapes

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Hello! This is a follow-up to MacCast 08.03.2005 and question asked by Charlie in Springfield, VA. A friend of Charlie's had asked him to convert an old Meryl Haggard audio tape to a CD. Charlie copied it to his Mac, devided the tracks and burned a CD (without labeling the Tracks or the Album) using Toast. When the CD was played in iTunes, all Album information was retrieved by the CDDB.

 

This happened most likely for one of two reasons. Either the Record Company submitted the Total Tracks and Toal Album/Individual Tracks running time, even though a CD was never produced. Or someone did exactly as Charlie had but went one step further by labeling all Tracks and then submitting the Album to the CDDB.

 

I have done this before using Quintessential Player on the PC. It has a feature to submit a CD to the DB. In the past I have created a Mix CD and only labeled the Tracks as track01, track02, etc. After buring the CD, I'll open it with Quintessential (or any other player) and of course it's not found in the CDDB. Within Quintessential I'll create the Album and Track tags, submit this information to the CDDB and from that point on, no matter what OS or Audio Player I use, it'll find the Album information.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Mark

Cincinnati

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Hello! This is a follow-up to MacCast 08.03.2005 and question asked by Charlie in Springfield, VA. A friend of Charlie's had asked him to convert an old Meryl Haggard audio tape to a CD. Charlie copied it to his Mac, devided the tracks and burned a CD (without labeling the Tracks or the Album) using Toast. When the CD was played in iTunes, all Album information was retrieved by the CDDB.

 

Hey folks,

 

This behavior is rare but not unheard of...A quick explanation maybe in order. CDs contain a unique ID for each title called the ISR Code, but not many transports can read it. So, Gracenote (the company that owns CDDB) stores metadata on a CD's track timings and the spacing between tracks, and uses that info, along with their "fuzzy matching" technology, to identify a disc. That's why sometimes, it pops up several titles and asks you to pick the correct one, since their timings are quite similar.

 

Anyway, Charlie happened to trim and mark the songs very closely to the CD release version and so his CD-R timings matched the release version closely enough to produce a match in the database. Sorry, no voodoo...

 

BTW, we're the folks that defined the desktop CD "premastering" industry, which basically means doing what Charlie did, and we're Mac fanatics!

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