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zionlion

LEOPARD UPDATE 10.5.2

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Leopard users, 10.5.2 is now avaliable!!

 

Link to Apple Combo

 

Backup Backup and Backup my friends ;-)

 

The Mac OS X 10.5.2 Update is recommended for all users running Mac OS X 10.5 or 10.5.1 Leopard. It includes general operating system improvements that enhance the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac. For detailed information about security updates, please visit this website.

Important: Read before installing

It is recommended that you back up your system prior to installing any updates.

The installation process should not be interrupted, even if the progress bar remains unchanged for several minutes. If a power outage or other interruption occurs during installation, use the standalone installer (see below) from Apple Support Downloads to update.

You may experience unexpected results if you have third-party system software modifications installed, or if you've modified the operating system through other means. (This does not apply to normal application software installation.)

If issues occur during installation--for example, if Software Update quits unexpectedly--please see this article.

Installing this update

To update to Mac OS X 10.5.2, use Software Update or the standalone installer. You only need to use one of these methods to update your computer.

 

Software Update

 

Choose Software Update from the Apple menu to automatically check for the latest Apple software using the Internet, including this update. (Software Update might have linked you to this article to learn more about the update.) If your computer is not up-to-date, other software updates available for your computer may appear that you should install. Note that an update's size may vary from computer to computer when installed using Software Update. Also, some updates must be installed prior to others, so you should run Software Update more than once to make sure you have all available updates.

 

Standalone installer

 

You can download the update installer and run it manually if you don't want to use Software Update. The standalone installer is a useful option when you need to update multiple computers but only want to download the update once. The Mac OS X 10.5.2 Update standalone installer is available from Apple Support Downloads here.

 

What's included?

This update delivers several improvements for both PowerPC- and Intel-based Macs (as well as improvements provided in the Mac OS X 10.5.1 update.)

 

Active Directory

 

Addresses issues which could hinder or prevent binding Mac OS X 10.5.x clients to Active Directory domains.

AirPort

 

Improves connection reliability and stability

Includes 802.1X improvements.

Resolves certain kernel panics.

 

Back to my Mac

 

Adds support for more third-party routers, as detailed in this article.

 

Dashboard

 

Improves performance of certain Apple Dashboard widgets (such as Dictionary).

Addresses an issue in which Dashboard widgets may no longer be accessible after switching to or from an account that has Parental Controls enabled.

 

Dock

 

Updates Stacks with a List view option, a Folder view option, and an updated background for Grid view.

 

Desktop

 

Addresses legibility issues with the menu bar with an option to turn off transparency in Desktop & Screen Saver preferences.

Adjusts menus to be slightly-less translucent overall.

 

iCal

 

Improves iCal so that it accurately reflects responses to recurring meetings.

Addresses an issue in which a meeting may remain on the calendar after being cancelled.

Addresses stability issues related to .Mac syncing of iCal calendars.

Resolves an intermittent issue in which editing an event with attendees would cause the event to shrink and not register that the event was updated.

 

iChat

 

Addresses an issue with simultaneously-logged in accounts in which iChat sounds generated from one account might be heard in another account.

Fixes an issue in which iChat idle time is affected by Time Machine backups.

Improves connectivity when running iChat behind a router that doesn’t preserve ports.

Enables logged chats from previous versions of iChat to open faster and more reliably.

Addresses an issue with text chats in which users may be unable to receive messages from the sender.

Addresses an issue that may prevent rejoining an AIM chat room without reopening iChat.

Addresses video chat compatibility issues with AIM 6 and third-party routers.

Fixes an issue with case-sensitivity of AIM handles.

 

iSync

 

Adds support for Samsung D600E and D900i phones.

 

Finder

 

Addresses an issue in which Finder could unexpectedly quit when displaying folder contents in Column view.

Addresses an issue in which Finder could unexpectedly quit when accessing Users and Groups in a Get Info pane.

Resolves an issue that prevented setting permissions on a folder alias.

Resolves an issue in which the Eject command could write to a disc in the optical drive.

Fixes an issue in which the scroll bar might disappear when deleting a file within a folder that includes files that are out of view.

Fixes an issue in the Sharing & Permissions section of Get Info windows, in which the gear icon appears to be gray/disabled after authentication.

Addresses an issue in which the Show Icon Preview preference might not be not saved when turning it off.

Fixes an issue that could occur when trying to print an image from the Finder.

 

Mail

 

Addresses an issue with Message menu's Mark > As Read choice.

Fixes an issue in which duplicate On My Mac folders may appear in the sidebar after upgrading to Leopard.

Improves the accuracy of the Data Detectors feature.

Resolves an issue with scrolling through a Note that is displayed using the split view in the message window.

Fixes an issue with deleting messages located in the Drafts folder.

Fixes an issue in which dragging the icon in the Safari URL field into a Mail message creates an attachment instead of a link.

Addresses an issue found when opening a item in the Notes folder that is not a Note.

Fixes an issue that may prevent RSS feeds from being delivered in Mail.

Resolves an issue in which a selected message could "flash" from blue to gray when in Organize by Thread mode.

Fixes an issue with scrolling between multiple To Dos in an email message.

Fixes an issue in which the body of email messages with certain MIME structures may not be displayed.

Improves performance with America Online (AOL) account-based messages in Mail.

Addresses issues with some ISPs during automatic set-up in Mail.

Addresses an issue in which Mail might not send mail on some networks to some SMTP servers.

Mail now automatically disables the (unsupported) third-party plugin GrowlMail version 1.1.2 or earlier to avoid issues.

Adds an option to view large icons in the Mailbox list.

 

Networking

 

Addresses a hanging issue that may occur when connecting to an AFP network volume.

 

Parental Controls

 

Improves stability when opening the Parental Controls System Preferences pane.

Fixes an issue that may prevent changes to the email address for permission requests.

Addresses an issue with printer administration for a guest account enabled with Parental Controls.

Addresses an issue with setting printer administration privileges from another Mac on the local network.

Fixes an issue that could prevent certain applications from being allowed.

Addresses accuracy issues with the web content filter.

 

Preview

 

Improves stability when scrolling through a PDF document.

Fixes an issue that prevents tabbing within a PDF document after clicking on the PDF.

Improves the Mail Document feature so that email attachments are more reliably created from Print Preview.

 

Printing

 

Addresses an issue in which remote printers may be deleted when the computer is put to sleep.

Improves printing performance when using some Microsoft Office applications.

Resolves an issue with some printing options, such as landscape orientation, number of copies, two-sided printing, and so forth that may not have functioned with some printers shared by Microsoft Windows.

Adds support for certain printers connected to the USB port of an AirPort Extreme or AirPort Express base station.

Resolves a stalling issue that could occur when installing certain Canon printing software from a disc.

 

RAW Image

 

Adds RAW image support for several cameras, as detailed in this article.

 

Safari

 

Addresses issues with Safari reliably resolving certain domains.

Login and Setup Assistant

Addresses an issue in which Setup Assistant could unexpectedly appear each time Mac OS X 10.5 starts up.

Improves stability and performance during log in.

 

System

 

Improves the accuracy of the grammar checker.

The computer will now shut down if an automatic disk repair does not succeed during startup.

 

Time Machine

 

Adds a menu bar option for accessing Time Machine features (the menu extra can be enabled in Time Machine preferences).

Improves backup reliability when computer name contains slash or non-ASCII characters.

Fixes an issue in which the backup disk displayed in the Finder may be out of sync with the disk chosen for Time Machine.

Addresses issues in which some external drives are not recognized by Time Machine.

The status menu now appears by default.

 

Other

 

Improves general stability when running third-party applications.

Addresses an issue in which the incorrect search results may be displayed for certain Automator Find/Filter actions.

Addresses an issue with the Latvian and Russian keyboard layouts.

Addresses an issue in which the backlight could turn off before Energy Saver's backlight setting.

Edited by zionlion

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Of course, I already had a recent backup with SuperDuper! and TimeMachine. The update was very easy, although the Mac rebooted twice during the installation, and kept doing a lot of things after logging into my account, especially with my iDisk. I just let it settle and then rebooted. Now I'm repairing disk permissions, after which I will be rebooting (again).

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Of course, I already had a recent backup with SuperDuper! and TimeMachine. The update was very easy, although the Mac rebooted twice during the installation, and kept doing a lot of things after logging into my account, especially with my iDisk. I just let it settle and then rebooted. Now I'm repairing disk permissions, after which I will be rebooting (again).

 

Sound pretty good:-)

 

Hearing a few problems on the boards related to iCal "Duplicating" Appointments and Weird goings on with your Mac Name.

 

Currently installing on my MBP and holding my breath, be great to see what your outcome is.

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Dont forget to run Software Update after Installing 10.5.2 to get the Leopard Graphics Update 1.0.

 

All seems good up to now, everything is crossed.

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The Graphics Update is a Godsend. My 2.0 GHz MBP had always felt less than snappy when it came to animations, etc. - anything seeming to do with Core Image. However, after the driver update, everything is as smooth as I had hoped it would be from the beginning. Sweet.

 

Regards,

Curt

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I've been waiting for this ever since Adam and Victor said it was on the way ( I even think they scooped the TWiT guys on this one ). I just love the new options, especially being able to make the menu bar solid and the Time Machine Menu bar item.

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I think this version is good enough for most people to upgrade to Leopard. All the paper cuts have been removed. Optional solid menu bar, and a folder-subfolder functionality in the Dock is back.

 

Sweet!

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I think this version is good enough for most people to upgrade to Leopard. All the paper cuts have been removed. Optional solid menu bar, and a folder-subfolder functionality in the Dock is back.

 

Sweet!

 

List view is back!! praise be ;-)

20080212-1f6gh278c8suuwaaxq5ss1sm9.jpg

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On another Mac website, I got the comment not to repair permissions after updating the OS, because it only restores the file permissions to a prior known "ideal state", according to two of the posters. Disk Utility wouldn't be re-evaluating file permissions on the fly, but, instead, looking for past file permissions, and pick those that seem to be the best. According to these people, repairing permissions could do more harm than good, and shouldn't be done as a routine.

 

Is there any truth to these claims?

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I've always gone by what Steve ( Mac Attack ) has said to do and that is to repair permissions, install the update, reboot twice and then repair permissions again. I've never had anything but a smooth update using this proceedure.

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I was following that advice by Steve as well, but I'm not so sure it isn't just a lot of unnecessary voodoo, to ward of the evil spirits of computer crashes and instability.

 

Perhaps I should just e-mail Steve (I'm a listener to his podcast).

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On another Mac website, I got the comment not to repair permissions after updating the OS, because it only restores the file permissions to a prior known "ideal state", according to two of the posters. Disk Utility wouldn't be re-evaluating file permissions on the fly, but, instead, looking for past file permissions, and pick those that seem to be the best. According to these people, repairing permissions could do more harm than good, and shouldn't be done as a routine.

 

People do seem to be passionate about Repair Permissions.

 

On the one hand, it's not nearly as important as some people make it out to be. I've seen people recommend Repair Permissions to cure system sluggishness, application crashing, even spelling mistakes, when of course it has nothing to do with any of those.

 

On the other hand, doesn't do much harm. They're probably right that it doesn't need to be done as a routine, but if you want to make it part of your routine go right ahead.

 

What Repair Permissions does is pretty simple. Every time you install something using Apple's package installer, the installer leaves a receipt in /Library/Receipts, listing exactly what was installed and what permissions it was installed with. Repair Permissions scans those receipts and restores those files (and only those files) to the permissions they were installed with. That's it! That's all it does!

 

Your documents are not scanned. Folders you create are not looked at. Applications you've installed by drag and drop are not considered. Files installed by any means other than the package installer are not analyzed. In particular, nothing in Library/Application Support or Library/Preferences is given the slightest attention, because those files are typically created by the application when you run it, not by the installer.

 

Sometimes the same file will be installed by multiple installers. (Different versions, perhaps, or a package reinstalling something "just in case" it wasn't already installed.) In general, conflicts are resolved in favor of the last package installed. This does put you at risk that it may have been the first installer that had it right.

 

And sometimes a package will install a file with the wrong permissions, thinking it doesn't matter because the permissions will change as the system runs. One such example is /var/log/secure.log. This is installed as an empty file with group=admin, but giving the group no access. It should actually be group-readable, so that an admin can view it in Console.app. And in fact, when the logs are rolled over, the new log does get the correct 640 permissions, giving admins read-only access. Until you run Repair Permissions, which cheerfully sets the file back to its original incorrect 600 permissions. This is an example of Repair Permissions doing the wrong thing.

 

But it's not that big a deal, either way. Admins should be monitoring secure.log, but they don't, so it doesn't really matter if they are mistakenly denied access. Most files whose permissions change after installation were changed by code that will change the permissions again after a Repair Permissions anyway. Repair Permissions usually does no great good and no great harm.

 

Repair Permissions is mostly for the case where your cousin complains that his computer isn't working right, and you discover that he's been "optimizing" /System by duplicating files, trashing files, changing permissions, renaming folders, all the sort of things that clever cousins with admin privileges are wont to do, and you have to put things right. Repair Permissions can be a useful tool. (So can a complete reinstall, along with an attitude readjustment.)

 

The main thing to remember about Repair Permissions is: it's not really all that big a deal. Stop making a big fuss about it, in either direction.

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Not in any way questioning you here, just asking because I'm interested, but where did you find this out from?

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I've noticed that coregraphics seem to be back to normal (after installing leopard they did seem a bit slower with an occasional hiccup

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Not in any way questioning you here, just asking because I'm interested, but where did you find this out from?

Where did who find out what? Do you mean where did I find out about Repair Permissions?

 

I'm one of those guys who loves to look under the hood and find out how the system works. Some of the steps along the way to this particular bit of information were:

  • In terminal, run man on everything in sight. In particular
    • man ditto (mentions bom files along the way)
    • man bom (discusses what a bom file is and what gets stored inside)
    • man lsbom (tool for listing bom files)

     

    [*] Show package contents on lots of packages, just to see what's inside. In particular

    Each .pkg file in /Library/Receipts is a package. Each of them is just a wrapper around a bom file. Run lsbom on each of those. Light comes on.

     

     

    [*] Notice when Repair Permissions does the wrong thing. Under 10.2, there were a couple of files that it would change the permissions on and then change right back, every time you ran it. Obvious hypothesis is that these files were each installed by separate installers, with conflicting permissions. Verify hypothesis by locating the receipts for these files. (Some Perl routines have the same name as the corresponding C system calls. It seems Perl and GCC were installing the man pages in the same place.) Misbehaving systems give you a lot of clues about how they work internally.

     

     

    [*] Get confirmation when Apple releases a technote describing the mechanism I had deduced. You can jump straight to the Cliff Notes at article 25751.

     

     

    [*] The error mentioned above was fixed when Apple started sorting the receipts to resolve conflicts. (That's what it's doing when it says "Determining correct permissions".) But there are still occasional errors. In particular, /var/log/secure.log seems to keep needing repair. I didn't know why, or which permissions were correct, until someone on Craig's List asked why it was that, even as an admin, he had no access to this file. Another light comes on.

And in general, the way to find out how things work is to dig, prod, read, hypothesize, run experiments to test hypotheses, dig some more. There may be a reason why it's called Computer Science.

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Well, that was very enlightening. Thank you for that!

 

Do you know of another program I could use to scan (and possibly repair) disk permissions and ACLs of files and folders that I have installed without Apple's installer app (e.g. by make install of an open source application)? I wouldn't want other users on my Mac to snoop around my own personal files and folders.

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10.5.2 seems to have broken my entourage. Gives me the spinning beach ball of death when I select email messages. I'm currently rebuilding my database with the hopes that this will fix the issue. It also screwed up my coworker's entourage and Illustrator CS3, but we seem to have fixed the Illustrator problem. We're both using dual processor G4's.

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Do you know of another program I could use to scan (and possibly repair) disk permissions and ACLs of files and folders that I have installed without Apple's installer app (e.g. by make install of an open source application)? I wouldn't want other users on my Mac to snoop around my own personal files and folders.

The problem with automatically "repairing" permissions is that there's no consensus what those permissions should be. What permissions you want to grant are your personal policy decision, and the system should honor whatever you decide. The Unix philosophy is to give you all the rope you want; what to do with it is up to you. Hang yourself, tie up the bad guys, hang the bad guys, play jump rope, your choice.

 

The only way to keep other users from snooping around in your personal files and folders is to give them their own account. Leopard makes that easy with the Guest account, except that by intention you can't pre-configure it. Alternatively, create an account named something like Friend or Visitor and pre-configure it the way you think your guests would like.

 

Check that the permissions on your own account are what you want by logging into the guest account and seeing how much of your own stuff they can see. They shouldn't be able to see anything except your Public and Sites folders, and any folders you create.

 

That last one may come as a surprise. OS X gives each user a ~/Documents folder that they can put their documents in, but doesn't force them to do so. In fact, the system itself puts documents in other folders, like ~/Music and ~/Pictures. (It has to. Your ~/Documents folder is off-limits to the system, just like /System is off-limits to you.) You may get the impression that you too can create your own Documents-like folders directly in your home folder.

 

And you can. But if you do, they'll behave like new ~/Public folders, not like new ~/Documents folders. If that's not the policy you want, change the permissions to be what you do want. (In particular, if you created ~/Applications, it's probably world-readable. Is that what you want? Maybe, maybe not. Only you can say.)

 

Don't forget to look at your home folder through command-line eyes, too. Unix creates invisible files at the top of your home folder. Mostly, it knows to create them with safe permissions, but if you created any yourself you probably made them world-readable. Think about whether you care whether anyone can read your .bash_login and .bashrc files, for example. (I decided I do want those files world-readable; it makes it easier to set up a new user if I can just clone the bash setup files from another account. But then, I don't put any passwords in there. For other files it might be a different story.)

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10.5.2 seems to have broken my entourage. Gives me the spinning beach ball of death when I select email messages. I'm currently rebuilding my database with the hopes that this will fix the issue. It also screwed up my coworker's entourage and Illustrator CS3, but we seem to have fixed the Illustrator problem. We're both using dual processor G4's.

 

After further screwing around I was able to figure out that it was actually Font Explorer X that 10.5.2 "broke". The ensuing font issues were then causing the other programs (including safari) to hang. The update to v1.2.3 of Font Explorer X seems to have fixed all these issues.

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I was following that advice by Steve as well, but I'm not so sure it isn't just a lot of unnecessary voodoo, to ward of the evil spirits of computer crashes and instability.

 

Perhaps I should just e-mail Steve (I'm a listener to his podcast).

 

As Steve and Victor have said on TMU Live, it may seem like Voodoo, but if you do something and you never get problems, why mess with a winning system? In other words, if the success is good, and it creates no other problems, why not keep doing it?

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As Steve and Victor have said on TMU Live, it may seem like Voodoo, but if you do something and you never get problems, why mess with a winning system? In other words, if the success is good, and it creates no other problems, why not keep doing it?

The problem with voodoo is that it takes time away from doing other things that need to be done.

 

Under Vintage MacOS (i.e., everything before OS X), there was lots of similar voodoo: rebuild your desktop, zap your PRAM, trash MacTCP DNR...

 

If a user had a problem (my modem won't dial out, Word's spellcheck doesn't work right, I'm getting 404 errors at this site) and asked at their neighborhood user group for help, the same litany of useless suggestions kept popping up, and no one would even consider what the problem might possibly be until all the voodoo spells had been cast. And recast again, for luck. (You zapped your PRAM? How many times did you let the startup chime sound? Five? Maybe you should let it chime seven times. It can't hurt.)

 

It's like having OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). First you wash your hands before going out the front door. Then you wash your hands, open the door, wash your hands again, then go out. Then you hop to the left after going through the door. Then you hop left, right, and left again. Pretty soon you've got this whole ritual that you have to go through every time you want to do something as simple as going through a door.

 

Computer users do the same thing; piling one pointless ritual on top of another. And all this does is take up time before you can actually get around to doing even the simplest things.

 

Fortunately, the move to OS X killed most of that foolishness. Unfortunately, I see a resurgence of new voodoo. And high on that list is Repair Permissions. Oh, and don't forget to restart before repairing permissions. Maybe you should restart twice, just to be sure. And do it daily.

 

The cost is that it wastes time. And that sometimes it does the wrong thing. And that it's embarrassing to the platform. Go ahead and do the voodoo if you want, but let's not give switchers the impression that OS X won't work right unless they too hop left, hop right, then hop left again.

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I hope Steve Stanger from The MacAttack can shed some light on this. I've sent him an email. If two knowledgeable people say repair permissions isn't really necessary, I'm convinced.

 

Of course, we don't want to be doing things that are unnecessary, because we (at least, I did) bought Macs to be more productive.

 

It's like some cultures do/did when the sun goes down. They have a big procession, and voila, next day the sun comes back. Why would they not do that ritual every evening, at the risk of the sun not returning next morning?

 

Unfortunately, nature and reality don't bend to our wills, at least, not that I know of.

 

(edited typos)

Edited by Ignoracious

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