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Setting up a new MacBook Pro

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Here's a question for the real geeks among us. I am about to purchase a new MacBook Pro (as soon as the upgraded models are released). Is there any advantage to reinstalling the system software as soon as I receive the computer, and before I install all my applications and move over my data? I know I might save a gig or two by avoiding the installation of languages I don't need, but I'm not sure if this is worth the trouble. I am more concerned with making sure that the system is optimized in every way possible before I set up the computer for actual use. I do not expect to have to do a reinstallation of the operating system for the three years that I usually keep a laptop. I am curious about the method Apple uses during manufacturing to get the system installed on each new system. Thanks for any opinions.

 

--Tom

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I think most of us who post here on any kind of regular basis are real geeks in one way or another. It's part of why we 'hang out' here.

 

Personally, I'd just use multilingual (I think that's what it's called) to remove the extra languages and free up the space, but it's your new machine. You're the only one who really knows if you'll be satisfied with how it works if you don't reinstall. My guess is you'll always have some nagging suspicion that it would run better if you had.

 

This is in now way a shot at your or your thought processes. It's just my distant viewpoint.

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I'd wipe it. You can also get rid of about 3Gb of printer drivers. Every printer I've ever used either comes with a CD or I can download the drivers from the internet if I ever need them. Apple installs EVERYTHING by default so it's easy for "normal" users to just plug things in and expect them to work.

 

I also uninstall the trial versions of everything (I know I'm going to be putting iWork on there) adn I get rid of some of the iLife suite (I've never used GarageBand for example). All these can be installed at a later date by putting the DVD in your computer and choosing "install bundled software".

 

I got my Leopard install down from about 12Gb to just over 6 and a half. That's quite a saving on a 160Gb drive.

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I'd wipe it. You can also get rid of about 3Gb of printer drivers. Every printer I've ever used either comes with a CD or I can download the drivers from the internet if I ever need them. Apple installs EVERYTHING by default so it's easy for "normal" users to just plug things in and expect them to work.

 

I also uninstall the trial versions of everything (I know I'm going to be putting iWork on there) adn I get rid of some of the iLife suite (I've never used GarageBand for example). All these can be installed at a later date by putting the DVD in your computer and choosing "install bundled software".

 

I got my Leopard install down from about 12Gb to just over 6 and a half. That's quite a saving on a 160Gb drive.

 

I would do the same.

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As one who has set up hundreds of new macs, there's something about taking it out of the box and using it that appeals to me. I never go through the trouble of re-installing. At work, we have a custom image we load onto our Macs, but for regular use, I don't really see much of an advantage in doing a clean install.

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Apart from getting 5Gb of disk space back?

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IMO it depends on the HD size. As Graham stated above, you can expect to recover about 5 GB of HD space. If that 5 GB means that much to you, then by all means wipe it. However, if like me, you have a 250 GB HD, and even with a 50 GB Windows partition you still have in excess of 50 GB freespace, I'd say leave it. After all, you can also recoup that HD manually later if you need to. But then again, remember the True Geek mantra ---- If it ain't broke, go ahead and fix it anyway.

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If you have to get going quickly, leave it alone. If you're in no hurry I'd say do a clean install and turn things off like additional fonts and X11.

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You know, I have to admit I forgot about X 11 being installed by default with Leopard, so that might be a good reason to clean install ( as log as you won't be using lots of Unix based programs like Open Office that is )

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Great replies; thank you all. I had not thought of the printer drivers (duh!) or X11 (which I had read about a while ago but promptly forgotten). I guess it's going to come down to what I feel like doing on the day the computer arrives.

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Great replies; thank you all. I had not thought of the printer drivers (duh!) or X11 (which I had read about a while ago but promptly forgotten). I guess it's going to come down to what I feel like doing on the day the computer arrives.

I like to also get rid of all of the demo software and the ilife stuff. Just me but I don't use them and the garageband installation is large. I do keep the printer drivers though. I have a laptop and I like knowing that I can ussually plug into any printer and have it just work.

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