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CyberBiker

Reading Labeled Disks is problematic

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Evnin' folks,

 

Over the past 4 years that I have had my powerbook & macbook, I have printed labels for a variety of the (mostly) DVD's I have used to save data on. The only problem, is that now I can't seem to read them correctly.

 

When I put them into my MacBook, there is a soft scraping sound, as if the disk is too thick for the slot based drive. Most of the disks (really essentially all of the labeled disks) won't spin up fast enough to be read, let alone copied off of. (I have been trying to consolidate my saved data and put in on newer disks).

 

I purchased a tray based drive which seems to work a little better, but there are still areas of every disk that cannot be read correctly.

 

This is a bit annoying since none of these disks go back before October of 2004 when I purchased my Powerbook.

 

Any ideas how I might get the data off these disks so I can put it on disks I can actually use?

 

This experience suggests that paper labels may not be the best way to label optical data disks that are to be used with a slot loading Mac optical drive.

 

BTW, I would happily be wrong about this. I like the labels, they are certainly better than the ones I write on the disk with a marker.

 

CyberBiker.

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You could try using vegetable oil to remove the labels, making sure there is no remaining residue before inserting in the drive.

 

All the data is burned to the other side.

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Baby oil works quite well (don't ask how I found that one out...).

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Have you used it on disc labels?

 

I haven't tried it on discs, but have used the veggie oil on glass and plastic to get labels off quite cleanly. I hadn't thought of baby oil but I believe you. I think somebody told me they used petroleum jelly, too.

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Not used it on disc labels, but it gets labels off plastic rather easily, and CD's don't mind a bit of gentle washing after, so I don't see why it wouldn't work. We use baby oil to get the gunk off after asset labels come off at work.

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I have had good amount of experience doing this from my job. The best product to use to remove the adhesive or any sticky residue is desolvit (http://www.dtep.com/de-solv-it.htm) You should be able to find this at target or walmart. You will still need to strip most of the paper to expose the adhesive underneath. Once you do that you should be able to spray the desolvit on and gently remove the residue. You can easily rinse the excess desolvit off with water then dry the cd with a soft cloth. Do not soak the cd in either water or the desolvit. Unlike baby oil or other similar products this product should not hurt your drive at all but if you don't completely clean it will cause it to have a citrus smell.

 

In my job I have to burn and catalog burned DVD's for safe keeping. Sharpie (or if you want to spring for it - the lightscribe disks/burners) are the way to go.

 

Bob

 

 

Evnin' folks,

 

Over the past 4 years that I have had my powerbook & macbook, I have printed labels for a variety of the (mostly) DVD's I have used to save data on. The only problem, is that now I can't seem to read them correctly.

 

When I put them into my MacBook, there is a soft scraping sound, as if the disk is too thick for the slot based drive. Most of the disks (really essentially all of the labeled disks) won't spin up fast enough to be read, let alone copied off of. (I have been trying to consolidate my saved data and put in on newer disks).

 

I purchased a tray based drive which seems to work a little better, but there are still areas of every disk that cannot be read correctly.

 

This is a bit annoying since none of these disks go back before October of 2004 when I purchased my Powerbook.

 

Any ideas how I might get the data off these disks so I can put it on disks I can actually use?

 

This experience suggests that paper labels may not be the best way to label optical data disks that are to be used with a slot loading Mac optical drive.

 

BTW, I would happily be wrong about this. I like the labels, they are certainly better than the ones I write on the disk with a marker.

 

CyberBiker.

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