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Hackintosh

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so what do you guys think about those who build "hackintoshes" or Osx86 computers. Pretty much to do this you buy standard pc hardware and build a computer (or buy one that is compatible) and download a patched version of osx.

 

So do you dispise those who do this or do you not really care?

 

Note: I know that 90% of the people that have done this ended up buying a mac.

 

You can learn more about this at http://www.insanelymac.com/

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I think, as long as you don't sell your Hackintosh, it is a great project to do. I'm sure you learn a lot about computers, and even more about Mac OS X.

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I don't object and I agree it's probably a good learning experience.

 

I do think they're a little goofy, though. Part of the reason the Mac experience is so good is that the hardware and software are built for each other. Run of the mill x86 machines probably won't work nearly as well as a real Mac.

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I think if you want to build and or play with it just for fun or to play around and maybe learn something that's great. However, I don't think it's a good option for your "main" machine due to reliability issues. The only thing, if any, that I find funny is when PC users try to do this just to avoid buying a Mac ... thinking it will be no different than trying to install Ubuntu.

Edited by Dolphbucs

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I've been religiously reading their forums... And now they have it down to installing from a certain disc and applying one patch for must boards...

 

I think its a great project, but some of the people on the forums were saying how horrible it was for them to do this. I was just wondering what you guys would think about it.

 

What i do like about it... is i can build a computer that is in-between a mac pro and iMac in performance for 700 $ (including moniter)

 

that being said... i'd rather be able to get a macbook pro. Also according to one member, who asked at a apple store, Apple's Officail stand is that it can't be done. So their are ignoring it. (plus their eula says it has to be apple branded hardware, but not branded by apple, which means i put a sticker on it and call it a mac rofl)

 

All in all i see it as a geeky hobby :) even though i have a friend who uses one for work.

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I've been tempted to do this for a little side project, but I'd never consider it a true replacement for a real mac. Firstly you're going to get stability issues, secondly it's going to look fugly compared to a mac.

 

I wouldn't trust it for work, let's put it that way.

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well the only reason it makes sense for me is i'm going to have to run xp a lot for school :( i'm mainly doing this so i don't have to spend the next three years of high school on a craptasticle laptop my school sent me... Plus inorder to spec out the mac i want is 2,000 usd... And i just want to be able to say i built my own computer ;)

 

ik there are some legalitys.... but i was just wondering what you guys thought about it ;)

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It's not the legalities I was talking about, it's plain not going to be stable since most of the drivers for it are hacked things. It WILL crash all the time. Well, it will crash as much as bloody windows (probably more). The reason macs are so stable is because there is a very limited range of components that apple uses, so they don't have too many drivers to write.

 

I'd forget about this for school and not get the computer you want and get the computer you need. Chances are a macbook will do you fine. In all honesty a macbook would probably have been fine for me and I did a computing degree (but I saved long and hard and got myself the macbook pro anyway).

 

Summary: Fun as a side project, would never, ever trust this for work.

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I had OSx86 (10.4.5 i believe) running on a laptop a month or so before I bought my Macbook (in fact it helped my decision to buy it tremendously.)

 

It was a cheap piece of crap toshiba (1.3 celeron m, 512mb of ram, 40gb hard drive), and everything worked but the sound (i just find it odd I had wifi but no sound, figured it would have been reversed), but it was pretty darn stable and relatively fast.

 

My boss also had me install it on his laptop which was a pentium 4 2.2 with 256mb of ram, and it ran just as good but a little less stable and no wifi.

 

Wasn't as good as running it on my Macbook, but either way, it was more stable then any installation of Fedora I've ever used.

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It's not the legalities I was talking about, it's plain not going to be stable since most of the drivers for it are hacked things. It WILL crash all the time. Well, it will crash as much as bloody windows (probably more). The reason macs are so stable is because there is a very limited range of components that apple uses, so they don't have too many drivers to write.

 

I'd forget about this for school and not get the computer you want and get the computer you need. Chances are a macbook will do you fine. In all honesty a macbook would probably have been fine for me and I did a computing degree (but I saved long and hard and got myself the macbook pro anyway).

 

Summary: Fun as a side project, would never, ever trust this for work.

 

actually i believe its much more stable then you think... They have had full efi and vanilla kernals running on them for sometime... so if you get the right mobo and supported video cards, you can even do 90% of the updates in software update...

 

The thing is the set up... if you don't have problems with the set up and the first hour running it after you start your golden :)

 

that being said, I would say its much more work to maintain then a normal mac... just because you have real support ;) and don't have to solve everything yourself.

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I don't think that the problem of stability lies in which configuration you use (real Mac or PC), but rather in the hardware components of the computer and the peripherals. I believe some users have a bad Windows experience, because they run Windows on a substandard computer. If you run Windows on a A brand computer (e.g. Dell), it is much more stable than the desktop PC you buy in a grocery store for half the price (or less) of an iMac.

 

Remember, a digital (binary) computer is in principle a very inaccurate device, made reliable by a lot of engineering and built-in error correct circuitry. In case of bad engineering or failing error correction, the computer will crash. In fact, every day, worldwide, many computers crash, and not only Windows PCs. It may be a hardware crash, software crash, or a combination of both. The stability of computers is far overrated, it seems.

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I'm building a pc this summer with an Intel chip, is there any such thing as boot camp on a pc? Or if I hackintosh it, will it be able to run windows as well?

Many Thanks,

IRM

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In my experience with hackintoshing the dell mini 9, it is possible, but not really worth it. You can't use the standard bootcamp, you need to use a bootloader such as GRUB. Lots of hassle.

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Read about this in a mag a while ago, sounds like an interesting project, but a lot of hassles come with building it, like problems with turning it off among other things of the sort. If you really wanted to construct your own computer, but are ever loyal to Mac, then Hackintoshing i probably what you would.

 

I don't object to people making these things, I would think of it as a good challenge. You'd learn a lot more about making a computer and the hardware involved too.

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Building a PC from scratch to run Windows on is all well and good if you get the relevant drivers for the hardware at the time. However, as several have said, doing the same to run OS X would be troublesome and unless you like a challenge and don't mind a few more crashes than your average PC running Windows then putting Mac OS X would be fine - legal issues aside. One of the reasons I switched from Windows to OS X (running on a Mac) was the challenge of finding suitable drivers becoming a chore. (Mind you I did build boxes from cast-off components so the bar was high.) It's almost a year to the day since I last used a couple of PCs which I built - one main and one reserve - I having three Mac minis then, all media centres, with the failure of a PSU in one of the PCs finally persuading me to move all my data to one of them and start using that. (Transferring my locally-store e-mail data was the biggest hurdle - some being in Outlook and some in Outlook Express - but I bit the bullet and got there.) I've never looked back and although I've got to fix a friend's eMac's hard drive & power button and to do this & that to my fiancee's iBook it's a lot less hassle when you've got a limited set of components to worry about.

Edited by Harry_The_Bustard

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