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tmack

Do I still need OS9 or Classic?

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I have a G4 Digital audio Dual 533. I got it right before OSX came out. I have upgraded over the years and am now running 10.4.11 with no problem. I haven't used anything from OS9 or Classic in years. Do I still need to keep it on my hard drive? If I were to get rid of it, how do I do it and what do I keep and what do I throw away?

 

Thanks in advance.

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Since you haven't used it in years, get rid of it. Just dump your system folder (the one with a 9 on it) and your Applications (Mac OS 9) folder. Shouldn't need to do anything else.

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Since you haven't used it in years, get rid of it. Just dump your system folder (the one with a 9 on it) and your Applications (Mac OS 9) folder. Shouldn't need to do anything else.

 

I dumped OS 9 on my main machines when 10.2 came out, however I still dual boot my iMac G3 600 just so I can play You Don't Know Jack with my wife. That sure is a fun game, but I don't keep OS 9 on any of daily use Macs.

 

roog

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I have a G4 Digital audio Dual 533. I got it right before OSX came out. I have upgraded over the years and am now running 10.4.11 with no problem. I haven't used anything from OS9 or Classic in years. Do I still need to keep it on my hard drive? If I were to get rid of it, how do I do it and what do I keep and what do I throw away?

You don't need it and can safely throw it away. The only thing you need to watch out for is that Vintage MacOS (anything pre-OS X) would let you put documents pretty much wherever you wanted. It was not uncommon for users to store documents in the same folder as the application that created them. Even if you've long since upgraded to OS X versions of those applications, the documents may still live intermingled with your classic applications. Before trashing any classic folders, you might want to peek inside, perhaps using Spotlight to locate recently opened documents. (Search for "Last Opened" "Within Last" ... .) That having been said...

 

Your classic System folder can have any name, but the default name is "/System Folder". By definition, a "system folder" is any folder that contains files named "System" and "Finder". Delete any of those you find, except /System/Library/CoreServices. (That's your OS X system folder, and you kinda want to keep that; all other system folders are for classic. But you don't need to search for them. The "Classic" pane of System Preferences will find them for you.)

 

Your classic applications can be anywhere, but by default they're in "/Applications (Mac OS 9)". (Or something close to that. I long ago renamed these folders to "/Classic/System" and "/Classic/Applications", because I got annoyed that their presence interfered with autocompletion in Terminal when I wanted to look in /Applications or /System.) Delete that, along with any other classic applications you find. (Get Info will show "Kind: Application (Classic)". Use Spotlight to search for "Kind" "Others..." "Classic Application".)

 

After deleting your classic applications, you might be able to reclaim a little disk space by rebuilding the classic desktop database one last time. (Look in System Preferences -> Classic -> Advanced.)This is a purely optional optimization that will produce a positive but probably insignificant performance boost. (Even though it's a legacy database, Launch Services still uses it, even on Leopard on Intel where there has never been any flavor of Classic. Databases work better if you eliminate useless data from them.)

 

Your classic desktop is in a normally invisible folder named "/Desktop Folder". Since it's normally invisible, OS X automatically creates a visible alias to it, named "Desktop (Mac OS 9)" if and only if there is anything in there. If you move everything out of your classic desktop, that alias will disappear on the next restart. If you want, you can also delete "/Desktop Folder" itself, but the only space it takes up is for the invisible .DS_Store file inside, and a little space in the catalog.

 

Do not delete /System/Library/CoreServices/Classic. That and everything else inside /System is off-limits. You can look, but don't touch.

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I dumped OS 9 on my main machines when 10.2 came out, however I still dual boot my iMac G3 600 just so I can play You Don't Know Jack with my wife. That sure is a fun game, but I don't keep OS 9 on any of daily use Macs.

 

roog

 

Speaking of games, Starcraft and Blood Bath at Red Falls are another good reason to keep OS 9 around.wink.gif

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Another word of caution, and both of these comments may not affect you at all:

 

1. Back when CD's cost like $5 ea. my office would compress everything prior to CD archive. Now we have a whole bunch of CD's with DiskDoubler archives on them which (I believe) will not decompress under OSX.

 

2. If you were like me, you never added file extensions to OS 9 document names. This can be a nightmare to try to figure out what type of document your file was/is later on in X. OS9 was generally smart enough to display the proper icon for the file which would easily identify it.

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