Jump to content
Don

Proactively replacing hard drive

Recommended Posts

Don    0

I have an iMac G4 1.0Ghz flat screen, probably five years old. It's been completely trouble free. I backup twice monthly to an external Firewire drive.

 

I'm wondering if I should replace the 80GB internal hard drive to guard against a hard drive failure on a machine this old? In other words, replace the HD now, at my leisure, before it fails and leaves me in a bind.

 

Or should I just run this machine as is and plan on upgrading sooner to an Intel iMac?

 

Thanks for any advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CyberBiker    0
I have an iMac G4 1.0Ghz flat screen, probably five years old. It's been completely trouble free. I backup twice monthly to an external Firewire drive.

 

I'm wondering if I should replace the 80GB internal hard drive to guard against a hard drive failure on a machine this old? In other words, replace the HD now, at my leisure, before it fails and leaves me in a bind.

 

Or should I just run this machine as is and plan on upgrading sooner to an Intel iMac?

 

Thanks for any advice.

 

 

I am no expert, just a long time (since 1982) user of all kinds of hardware.

Since your old hard drive is working well, if it passes the "disk verification" of Disk Utility, I would be inclined to keep using it unless it just gets too small for the data you want to put on it.

 

It may be useful to turn up your paranoia level just a bit and back up more often if your are even a little concerned about how the drive is working.

 

In reality, that little 80G HD owes you nothing if you have gotten 5 years out of it. The warranty is about to expire as well. Larger drives are inexpensive compared to when you originally got the 80G. Given all of that, you certainly couldn't be faulted for wanting a newer drive. Just make sure it has a good warranty and keep it backed up.

 

Having presented 3 different approaches, I would lean toward the second, more frequent backups. That would give you more data security at the least cost (nothing).

 

Good Luck

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trucklover    0
I have an iMac G4 1.0Ghz flat screen, probably five years old. It's been completely trouble free. I backup twice monthly to an external Firewire drive.

 

I'm wondering if I should replace the 80GB internal hard drive to guard against a hard drive failure on a machine this old? In other words, replace the HD now, at my leisure, before it fails and leaves me in a bind.

 

Or should I just run this machine as is and plan on upgrading sooner to an Intel iMac?

 

Thanks for any advice.

 

Are you using software that makes a bootable clone of the iMac? Super Duper and Carbon Copy Cloner do this very well. You can get either of these applications to automate the process leaving you to not worry about it. If that 80GB hard drive fails you will be able to boot off of an external firewire drive. USB external hardware is not bootable with PowerPC architectures. If booting off of the external you are using an exact copy of your computer. This will allow you time to get a replacement for the iMac. I would let the HDD keep on trucking if you are not running out of space and are content with it or upgrade to an Intel machine and have both Macs. That's what I have done, I have a PowerMac G5 that is my main workstation with dual 19" displays and 3TB of internal hard drive space and a 15"MacBook Pro. I love both machines using them for different purposes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don    0

Thanks guys, great advice. I'm using Super Duper and I can boot from the Firewire backup. I tried that the other day just to be sure.

 

Sounds like my best strategy is to keep the original HD going since I'm not running out of space, and just backup more frequently. My every two week backups are a little infrequent if I had to do a restore. My Firewire drive is a 160GB partitioned into two 80GB discs and I alternate between the two partitions when I backup. Think I will go on a weekly backup schedule.

 

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard drives WILL burn out. A new drive is not expensive. Better to do it when it is convenient for you than when it decides it's time to quit. I have a newer iMac than yours and have already replaced the hard drive. I'd do it soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
roogie    1
Hard drives WILL burn out. A new drive is not expensive. Better to do it when it is convenient for you than when it decides it's time to quit. I have a newer iMac than yours and have already replaced the hard drive. I'd do it soon.

 

Hard drives can fail in goofy ways, I had one that starting getting corrupted and when I did my backups it copied all my corrupted files over my good backups. Luckily I had duplicate backups of things like documents and images, but I had to rerip most of my music.

 

roog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ignoracious    1
My Firewire drive is a 160GB partitioned into two 80GB discs and I alternate between the two partitions when I backup. Think I will go on a weekly backup schedule.

You should realize that if you have a catastrophic failure on that external, you lose both partitions. It is a single point of failure. You should have at least two (physically) separate copies of your original data to have some degree of protection against data loss, preferably geographically separated. Online storage counts as a backup copy as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don    0
You should realize that if you have a catastrophic failure on that external, you lose both partitions. It is a single point of failure. You should have at least two (physically) separate copies of your original data to have some degree of protection against data loss, preferably geographically separated. Online storage counts as a backup copy as well.

 

Yes, I realize that I would lose both partitions if the FW drive failed. But I figured that alternating between partitions when backing up would give me two versions of the backup data, which should be preferable to a single version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

×