Jump to content
sleepingmac

Migrating without Migration Assistant

Recommended Posts

I'm thinking about doing a clean install of snow leopard and upgrade to tiger as Adam has done. I listened to the maccast members episode where Adam describes in detail how he did it. He said he did not use Migration Assistant at all. I am guessing that he transferred over his iCal & Address book data using MobileMe sync. What is the easiest way to bring back my iCal & Address book data without using migration assistant OR MobileMe? (i don't have MobileMe)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> I listened to the maccast members episode where Adam describes in detail how he did it.

I just want to point out that the answer to your question is right there. stating the obvious, just listen that particular maccast again. but this time take notes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> I listened to the maccast members episode where Adam describes in detail how he did it.

I just want to point out that the answer to your question is right there. stating the obvious, just listen that particular maccast again. but this time take notes!

 

hmm ok, i will listen again and take notes with Circus Ponies NoteBook. thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And, I would just like to point out that if you are already running Snow Leopard, if you use the method that John pointed out in another thread, you can burn a DVD Lion Install disc and do the clean install from that ... without having to upgrade over Snow Leopard. That would give you a TRULY clean install.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here's another take on migrating without migration assistant.

 

order a new big hard drive and a external case to put it in. it doesn't matter if the case is USB or Firewire.

 

copy the old hard drive to the new one using using Disk Utility or Carbon Copy Cloner. it will take about 3 hours over USB and around 1 hour using FireWire.

 

remove the old hard drive from the MacBook, MacBook Pro or iMac. new MacBook Pro's are easy to swap drives compared to the old case (which I equate to brain surgery). and the plastic MacBooks are made with swapping drives in mind. you'll need tools for the iMac like suction grips and pry bars. for all of these swaps you should have a collection of torex and small screw drivers. use MacFixIt for complete details on the steps required for swapping a drive.

 

after removing the old drive, put the new drive in it's place. put it all back together.

power on. watch it boot. cool it works.

 

now install Lion on your new internal hard drive. no migrating required. it will just move all your old everything into the new new.

 

something to note: it's only been a problem once where the Adobe apps through a fit about being on a new OS on a new hard drive. ever since I've de-activated the Creative Suite before doing an upgrade. YMMV.

 

another thing to note: you'll have a complete and bootable backup of your exact system before you did an upgrade. this will allow you to go back to when it all just worked if your new kitty isn't all that and a bag of chips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you have an external drive that is an exact clone of your internal drive... then why would you physically swap them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are three reasons to swap drives:

 

1) you always want a larger / faster hard drive. note that I wrote "order a BIG new hard drive." a 500G drive costs around $80. and there are 640G, 750G and 1T available for not much more.

 

2) hard drives fail. if you have a Mac in use for over 3 years it's a really good idea to replace the drive. all drives have a MTBF (mean time between failure) that is measured in hours which is actually very close to the warrantee offered by the manufacture. once a drive is past it's MTBF rating or number all bets are off. in my office every MacBook (old style C2D) have with either a 80G or 120G drive failed. these would be 2007 era computers. Apple even has/had a replacement program for this machine's drive.

 

3) there are always advances in drives. although very small ones. it's possible that the new drive will just perform better in the old Mac offering "just that little extra" speed. some of this is the same placebo effect like you feel when you get new car seats the car seems to run better. sometimes you can actually feel a difference. and this it can be measured with time trials and benchmarks. your perception can feel changes as long as 1/30th a second. while shorter times (1/60 and faster) should feel the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok thanks. i may not do this for a few days as I'm still in the "cleaning the crap off your old system" phase. but ill post here if i run into any issues as i make the switch over to Lion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

×