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JoeT

RAM upgrade causing more memory usage

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JoeT    0

I upgraded my Late 2009 iMac from 4GB of RAM to 8GB...the computer runs great, but I've noticed that the programs I normally use, specifically Safari and iTunes, are taking up more RAM than they did when I had the 4GB installed. Is this a normal occurrence where programs recognize additional memory and therefore use more to run their smoothest. I was playing audio track on iTunes and the program was using nearly 600MB of RAM and Safari about the same.

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Buckeyes    0

Is there a certain company to buy from? I've looked as Ramjet.com that says they hold to the Apple specs. Does this really make a difference?

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johnfoster    49

when RAM comes off of a silicon wafer it is tested for it's ability then it's labeled with that specific grade. this is done because not every single "chip" is perfect. it's a not a problem per se but the nature of the silicon making process. it's why some processors clock at 3GHz while others can only sustain 2.2GHz. the industry deals with these imperfections by selling a wide range of parts instead of tossing the less capable ones.

 

the fastest RAM obviously commands a better price even though the cost to make the slow parts is the same as the fast parts. this has been the model for silicon since it was first invented 50 years ago. it's the same with RAM, CPUs, FPGAs, ASICS and even amplifiers.

 

anyway, all RAM has different timings. you'll see these labels as PC3-5300, PC22100 or the very, very old PC100. but the PC-XXX isn't the whole story. the RAM may go at that speed but it will also have timing buffers. these are labeled like 322, 333, 311, 321 or it might be a longer 3-2-2-8 or something like it. this tells you the CAS, RAS and other timings that the memory will tolerate. most "generic" motherboards will detect the timing of the RAM installed and adjust the bus clock to work at those speeds.

 

if you get out of spec with the speed or the timing then the computer will behave oddly. most of the time it will never boot because the post check will fail. it may chime at this point or just do nothing. RAM that is badly labeled or sold to you by an unscrupulous vender might work for a while and then suddenly fail when the process is under load or a RAM intensive task is underway.

 

some people swore that Samsung was the only RAM that worked well with the early Intel Macs. my experience showed that those Macs were very picky about the timing. what this meant was that any RAM could work as long as you go the correct timing. Apple has never been gracious with RAM timing and has been strict about works. benchmarks can be affected by using slower RAM as will overall performance. although you'd have to be some kind of less than a 1/100th of a second nerd to feel it. this is just one way to get everything in the product line to feel the same same.

Edited by johnfoster

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Buckeyes    0

So I read your thread. Thx. So is it still ok to buy ram from say "crucial" or does "ramjet" really have superior product?

 

when RAM comes off of a silicon wafer it is tested for it's ability then it's labeled with that specific grade. this is done because not every single "chip" is perfect. it's a not a problem per se but the nature of the silicon making process. it's why some processors clock at 3GHz while others can only sustain 2.2GHz. the industry deals with these imperfections by selling a wide range of parts instead of tossing the less capable ones.

 

the fastest RAM obviously commands a better price even though the cost to make the slow parts is the same as the fast parts. this has been the model for silicon since it was first invented 50 years ago. it's the same with RAM, CPUs, FPGAs, ASICS and even amplifiers.

 

anyway, all RAM has different timings. you'll see these labels as PC3-5300, PC22100 or the very, very old PC100. but the PC-XXX isn't the whole story. the RAM may go at that speed but it will also have timing buffers. these are labeled like 322, 333, 311, 321 or it might be a longer 3-2-2-8 or something like it. this tells you the CAS, RAS and other timings that the memory will tolerate. most "generic" motherboards will detect the timing of the RAM installed and adjust the bus clock to work at those speeds.

 

if you get out of spec with the speed or the timing then the computer will behave oddly. most of the time it will never boot because the post check will fail. it may chime at this point or just do nothing. RAM that is badly labeled or sold to you by an unscrupulous vender might work for a while and then suddenly fail when the process is under load or a RAM intensive task is underway.

 

some people swore that Samsung was the only RAM that worked well with the early Intel Macs. my experience showed that those Macs were very picky about the timing. what this meant was that any RAM could work as long as you go the correct timing. Apple has never been gracious with RAM timing and has been strict about works. benchmarks can be affected by using slower RAM as will overall performance. although you'd have to be some kind of less than a 1/100th of a second nerd to feel it. this is just one way to get everything in the product line to feel the same same.

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johnfoster    49

superior product… pfftt. like all electronics it either works or it does not.

 

keep in mind there are only a few Elpida, Samsung, Toshiba, Micron, etc, that actually make RAM chips. these are sold to literally hundreds of RAM vendors that mount them on SIMMs or DIMMs. these boards are then tested for speed and locked to that spec.

 

there is little difference between companies. Kingston differentiates itself from PNY by warrantee or replacement. the same way that Curcial competes against Apple branded RAM. in some cases the only difference is how good you feel about your purchase. here's why. like I said before, if you put RAM into a computer will either work or it won't. and once it works it will keep working for the life of the computer. that is unless the computer is damaged electrical event (lightning), by static (cold air in the winter add shag carpet), from a manufacturing defect (the chips unsolder from the board, or from heat (and work again for a bit after they cool off).

 

you can buy your RAM from anywhere but be sure to use the guide they provide for matching RAM to the model of Mac you have. the difference between "mac RAM" and "generic RAM" is timing. so don't assume that the bargain will work. it might but you don't know unless you are buying RAM often. you can check to see if you are paying an Apple Tax by looking that the specs of the RAM offered then checking for the price of that spec'd RAM from the place you are making the purchase. it should be the same same. if there is a difference make sure that the RAM you are comparing is Samsung vs Samsung and not Samsung vs Whatever.

 

don't buy into marketing. purchase RAM based on the cost, the 10 day return policy and the length of the warrantee.

 

don't over think this purchase. it's just RAM. the cost difference between these guys vs those guys borders on $10. meaning if you search around for more than an hour you are costing yourself the difference as if you were making minimum wage. of think of it as not driving across town burning $15 in gas to save $10 on a purchase. don't do that. use this tool instead:

 

http://www.ramseeker.com/

Edited by johnfoster

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