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Waldo Pepper

DNS on the router or the computer?

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Hi,

Wonder if someone can shed some light on this. I ran a utility called "namebench" to determine if i could speed up our internet connection. With the results in hand, do I put these DNS settings into the router or the computer?

I did put them in the router to begin with, then when i went to run "namebench" again, it auto populated the current DNS setting with what was in the computer (which hadn't been altered). I assumed the DNS it would be using or sensing would be the ones from the router?

I travel a lot between countries and so if i set this in the computer, i need to keep removing them when i leave my home, then back again when i return home.

Cheers

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johnfoster    48

if your IP addresses are handed out (aka managed) by DHCP the DNS entrees that you include in the router are dished out with the IP address. as you move from place to place the DNS will get changed along with the IP the new place is using. some "hot spots" will not work unless you use the DNS provided. and sometimes that DNS blocks certain sites (pr0n, pirate, hate, facebook, etc) because the place does not want to deal with the traffic. like DO YOUR WORK at WORK not look up cat videos…

sometimes you want to put a specific DNS in the computer. maybe for a GAME or a for testing to see if your newly updated DNS specs for a domain are updating. or your ISP provided DNS is flaky so you choose to use google or some other public server. 

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So it's safe to say then that regardless of what you have set in your system prefs on the computer, If the router has specific DNS addresses it will use those?

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MacCast    80

No @Waldo Pepper. If you manually enter the DNS addresses into the Network Setting in System Preferences on the Mac (under Advanced…), then those are the DNS setting that will be used (not the ones from the DNS router). It's actually one way you might get around DNS filtering/blocking on specific network. For example here is how its looks configured locally on my Mac for using the OpneDNS servers:

Screen Shot 2017-05-26 at 9.22.52 AM.png

 

Just remember that these are set per interface, so if you also use a wired Ethernet connection you'd need to set them there too.

All this said, at home I have the OpenDNS setting set up on my router so that all Macs/Devices in my home network are using OpenDNS. The main reason is because my cable ISPs DNS (Cox) has proven to be slow and unreliable in the past. That, and OpenDNS does automatic blocking of know hacked and attacked websites.

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johnfoster    48
Quote

 If the router has specific DNS addresses it will use those?

yes. unless you have manually entered DNS IPs for the interface. 

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johnfoster    48

openDNS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenDNS

https://www.opendns.com/setupguide/

there is a bunch of links that imply that you have to pay to play. you do not have to. there is not a really big benefit to giving up money. 

google DNS (public)
https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/
 

Advantage DNS

has different levels of filtering and performance based on IPs. kind of a cool idea.

https://www.neustar.biz/security/dns-services/free-recursive-dns-service

 

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