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scficz

Upgrading 2011 MacBook Pro

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scficz    0

Hello all.

I am planning to upgrade the hard drive on my 2011 MacBook Pro using a 

Samsung 850 EVO 500GB 2.5-Inch SATA III Internal SSD (MZ-75E500B/AM) and Super Duper to clone my drive.

Has anyone else done this and am I heading in the right direction with this SSD and is it with the investment with such an "old" laptop.

Thank you ahead of time for any help. 

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johnfoster    49
 
the steps I always follow are:
 
put the SSD in a external USB case. it can be a USB3 or USB2 case. it does not matter because the MBP from 2011 only has USB2. get the cheapest case you can find because you will never use it again. or you might if you put the old internal drive in here afterward. I would not. but that is because that drive is very old.
 
format the SSD with Disk Utility.  then use Carbon Copy Cloner to move the contents of the spinning disk to the SSD. it will take about 3-4 hours to complete. make sure the Energy Saver in System Preferences is set to NEVER sleep so that it will complete the task.
 
once the copy from there to here is completed check that the SSD will boot using Startup Disk in System Preferences. once you know that it does boot, shut down.
 
now, on to brian, err brain surgery. follow the guide on iFixit to open the MBP to replace the hard drive. never mind that there are no specific steps for SSD. the steps are the same same. SSD is a hard drive that does not spin.
 
check all the cables and connections one last time. then close it all up.
 
boot. bong. start up screen. hurray.
 
notice how fast it works now. like it is a brand new Mac. wonder why you waited so long to do this…
 
hurray.

 
Edited by johnfoster

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sdsteven    3

Thanks john foster. 

I will let you know how it works out

 

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johnfoster    49

I forgot to add another thing I almost always do. that is, remove the CD/DVD and replace it with another hard drive or another SSD. as a hard drive is BiGGER and CHEAPER compared to an SSD it makes it ideal for the big, archives, apps, and other not so accessed files. the CD / DVD Caddy used to cost lots more. but now that this particular Mac is old the upgrade is really cheap. eBay is your friend. for example…

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SATA-3-III-2nd-HDD-SSD-Opitcal-Caddy-Adapter-for-2009-2010-2011-2012-MacBook-Pro/252069988251?epid=918124682&hash=item3ab08ac79b:g:iYcAAOSwMmBV3XKY:sc:USPSFirstClass!94158!US!-1

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Eddie T    0

In 2011, I bought a top of the line MacBook Pro (2.3 Ghz i7, Hi-res Anti Glare Screen) and it is still going strong (Photoshop, Lightroom, Office, Keynote) due to upgrades along the way.  As well as replacing the battery twice and preventative maintenance of replacing the processor's thermal paste (quite a scary job at the time) here's how it now looks:

Original Spec included:   750GB HDD, 4GB RAM, DVD Drive, USB 2

Now Running:  256 SDD + 2TB HDD (replacing DVD - as JohnFoster's link), 16 GB RAM + a thunderbolt to USB 3 adaptor

I've looked at the latest MacBook Pro models and whilst I would love a retina screen and he performance increases of their new processors and architecture, I would miss the available storage I now have (unless I add over £1000 and custom configure it to include a 2TB SSD) and some of those things Apple used to do to help the professional market choose Apple - for example:

All the ports on on side - makes docking much neater

Reasonable selection of ports - inc. Mini DisplayPort, Thunderbolt, USB, Ethernet

Battery Gauge built into the case

MagSafe

Also, am I right in thinking the latest MacBooks can only be configured with 16GB RAM?  If this is the case, there is no upgrade here as my 2011 is already running with that amount of RAM.

I am hoping my 2011 model will soldier on until:

 - New MacBooks can be configured with 32GB RAM as user upgrades are no longer possible.

 - Apple release or recommend an official dock to plug into a USB-C port which gives Ethernet, USB 3, DisplayPort etc.

 - upgrading to 2TB of storage comes down in price.

I know this is a Wishlist and don't expect it to all 'come true' - I wonder what are my other options when I need to replace my MacBook Pro - probably go for refurbished older retina model.

 

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johnfoster    49
Posted (edited)

16 GB is it on the portables.

if you are needing more RAM or CPU/GPU or storage consider on of the 2008-2010 Mac Pro. you can get one of these for $400 or less. for this price you will not find one with a modern GPU. there are a few options for cards that will just drop in and work in the $100 range. do not be tempted for a more expensive more more card. and at some point a faster GPU will not help you. RAM wise you can get 32GB for under a $1oo. almost all of the available RAM is retired from servers so it is cheap. you do not need to get RAM with BiG fins as Apple warns. whatever, that Mac is long out of warrantee.

as I use tablets more and more I find my need for "portable Mac" nearly non-existent. and I really only use one when I travel. that Mac, a last of its kind 13" MPB, has 8GB of RAM and an SSD. it captures photos, edits, and has a workable keyboard. I loath the trackpad on it. when or if it stops working I will not replace it with another Mac. or maybe it will be a MacBook Air that gets gifted to me as this stuff happens. "want this?" she said. "sure… I can recycle it. thanks!"

one of my tado items is to do work on a Chromebook. given that these things are so cheap it has been on my radar to do a test. I have been reluctant because I do not like the far reach of any giant corporation(s). my files are my files blah blah blah. but there are reasons to work this way. maybe it will kinda sorta work for me. dunno.

unrelated to any of this. and more so you know where I am coming from how I use computers. I was given two older iPad. one of them I dedicated to the task of reading comics. the other is a synth because it does not work unless it has power.

Edited by johnfoster

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alanderego    0

Hi Guys,

My Wife's MBP 2012 has slowly be wanting more and more space and is getting slower and slower.

Anyway, I have decided to go with the OWC Data Doubler with a 500GB or 1TB SSD ($250 Sandisk at BestBuy) for the boot drive and a 2TB or maybe 3TB HDD  for everything else (right now she has about 100GB left on the 2TB HDD).  When I do the install, does it matter which drive I put where?  In other words, do I have to put the boot drive in the spot where the original drive is now and the HDD in the Data Doubler?

Also, are there any formatting tips anyone could give me?

I know there OWC has great install and formatting videos, but no videos on how to format the second drive.  I've read in another post about johnfoster using symbolic links (Did I assume that is what SYMLINK is?)

 

Thanks for any help,

 

Edited by alanderego

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johnfoster    49

put the SSD in place of the old HD. put the HD in the sled.

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johnfoster    49

the symlink link I wrote is outdated. there is a UI in the User & Groups that works better. Right Click on the name you will see an Advance Options… that gives you all the options that other thing did with a click.

Edited by johnfoster

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johnfoster    49
why is the simlink to the /applications folder on the HD outdated? two reasons. one is that when I wrote the SSD swap the storage was tiny and expensive. there simply was not room on a 32 or 64 gee bee “disk” for everything I was using. it really was just a boot disk for me. and in my day to day use I found that the benefits of a small SDD made the slight slowdown of having apps on the other disk almost unnoticeable. 
 
today, the SSD you want starts at 240 gee bees with a cost of under a hundred bucks. although you can get smaller 120s for $40. why subject yourself to smaller? unless your budget needs to be stretched to upgrade multiple machines buy the biggest thing you can afford. then you can put all your apps on the SSD to get the added benefit of that as well.
 
and with no need to manage the where apps live, just install away.
 
finally, always practice backup. get back blaze, another hard drive, or a NAS. put your important stuff another place.

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