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ipaiz

Scrateches in IPOD NANOS

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Adam:

 

I have been hearing about the problem with scrathed

nanos, I have a lot of experience in plastics and hard

materials. I am in the awards and jewerly industry,

and also I am an ipod owner.

 

I can guarantee you the solution of scratched nano

because of the experience I have in polishment.

 

Just buy No.1200 or 1500 sand paper (3m sand paper is

great)

and 3m RUBBING COMPOUND (can be the No. 5973). You can

buy this in places where sell accesories for car

paints. car shops, home depot, etc.

 

You are going to spend like $10.00 (and you will be

able to polish your screen many many times)

 

Procedure:

 

1. Sand the screen with the sand paper (number 1200 or

1500)with some drops of water so you can sand it a

little more smooth, sand it until you dont see or feel

the scratches, do not worry if at that time the screen

is completely satin or opaque.

 

2. With a soft or smooth fabric (I recommend cotton

fabric, an old t-shirt works great) start polishing

with the 3m Rubbing Compound until you see the opaque

converts into a very bright crystal like screen, Like

new. I guarantee U.

 

You can do this procedure any time you think your Ipod

nano or any ipod become ugly scratched.

 

Hope this can be usefull for maccast listeners.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Ivan

Guatemala

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Here is another solution from listener Wade:

I heard you mention some solutions to scratched iPod screens. I had great luck with getting out a gash in my iPod (full size early generation) screen with Flitz Plastic Cleaner which is recommended for CDs, Eisenglass, and Plexiglass. It says it "removes scuffs, swirl marks, ink, and graffiti." It took me probably 60 minutes circling the area on my screen to get the gash out, but now it's virtually gone. You have to look closely to realize it's not a new screen. It also took out scratches, of course. It's so fine, it takes a lot of elbow grease to work (I just put a dab on a cut up cotton t-shirt and rubbed it on with that). But it was really nice because the gash I had on it was bad enough that I was thinking of replacing the iPod because it was such an obstruction to the viewing of the screen. I picked up Flitz at the local hardware store. Their website is flitz.com.

 

I wouldn't recommend rubbing it on the click wheel area because I did and it caused it lose some of the smooth gliding feeling you get when using the click wheel, although it still functions fine.

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That is what I said, Plastics is like butter for regular polishments.

 

Scratches in plastics= no problem.

 

Congratulation for your new old screen, Adam.!!!

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I have listened to all the iPod Nano scratching issues and have taken the pre-caution of removing my new one out of the box with gloves on, left the plastic film on the front (minus the tag at the bottom) and placed it into a silcone case with screen protector. So I have 2 layers of protection on the front & one on the back. Hopefully that should keep it protected.

 

PS. It is still very useable! 8)

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I'd heard stories of the scratching, so when I got my Nano I left the original film that protects it in its box on until I got a 3rd party film product. Last night I applied the 3rd party film. First I peeled off the Nano's packing film. In doing so I got a few fingerprints on the black surface. I took a cleaning cloth that was from an old iPod care set and wiped 3-4 times. I was SCHOCKED to see that I'd already scratched the surface noticably. A gentle wipe even with an iPod specific product damages the surface.That's unacceptable.

 

I know what they mean about the screen becoming unreadable. My 2nd gen iPod floated around my book bag unprotected for 6 months. It became a real strain on my middle-aged eyes to try to read the screen through the scratches. I NEVER took the packing film off my iPod photo, until I had to submit it for repair because the HD died, and AppleCare insisted that I remove it.

 

Apple must be able to do better on this issue. They're geniuses! It says so on the bar!!!

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Hey Nano user, try polishing it with the tips we gave before. For that kind of scratches only polish it do not sand it with sandpaper, sanding is only for relally heavy scratches.

 

Hope these work. :D

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Having also been a jeweler and a general tinkerer, I sense Ipaiz is correct from my experiences with gold and silver and jeweler's rouge :-k , but damn, I'd be pretty reticent about taking sand paper to my 400 buck iPod, knowing that one predicted stage is satin opacity!!!

 

:shock: :shock: :shock:

 

Somehow I've picked up one deep scratch in my new 4G 60 GB screen just when I was going to put it on eBay in order to pick up a 5G so I'll have a CD quality podcast recording studio in my pocket wherever I am (and for turning unsuspecting bystanders onto Tikibar TV) -- and now I have a solution.

 

It just terrifies me.

 

So I might instead put in the hour of slower, finer polishing the other correspondent mentioned.

 

I would certainly try it out on some junk plastic and then on a less visible part of my 'pod before attacking the screen in any case. And I sense there's some skill and technique involved that not everyone might have. Do you agree??

 

But if you're still on this, IPaiz, what about skipping the sanding and just doing the polishing compound for a longer time?? And what are your feelings about the Brasso solution I believe Adam discussed in his show??

 

In any case I give you points for being hard core on this!!

 

:!: =D> :!:

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turtle wax polishing compound works for those cloudy surface scratches and is $3 for a tub that will last you 5 ipods.

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For minor scratches, those no so deep, it is ok only tu use BRASSO or 3m polishing compound, turtle wax rubbing compound may be also right.

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Thanks IPaiz.

 

You sound so authoritative I think you may actually get me to go for the true grit, i.e. the sand paper. But I'll still try it out on a non-critical area before directly going for the screen.....

 

:-$ (Wouldn't be prudent not to!)

 

....and I think people should understand that the finest sand paper in your local hardware store may be 400 -- not the 1200 or 1500 you mention -- which I've never actually seen and have no idea where to buy. But folks, if you go this route, 400 takes paint off cars in a second and is probably NOT amenable to Ipaiz' method!!

 

[-X

 

As for ongoing protection, anyone have any thoughts on this "thin film" I keep hearing discussed in various podcasts??

 

What is it? Where does one get it??

 

:?:

 

And there are as mentioned at least a few brands of polishes designed directly for plastics and eyeglass lenses. Anyone have some suggestions on those??

 

:?:

 

"Questions. We got lots and lots of questions."

 

But that's what forums are for......

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....and I think people should understand that the finest sand paper in your local hardware store may be 400 -- not the 1200 or 1500 you mention -- which I've never actually seen and have no idea where to buy.  But folks, if you go this route, 400 takes paint off cars in a second and is probably NOT amenable to Ipaiz' method!!

 

 

And there are as mentioned at least a few brands of polishes designed directly for plastics and eyeglass lenses.  Anyone have some suggestions on those??

 

you would be suprised how many hardware stores carry 1200-1500. and if your home depot or ace doesn't have it, any auto parts store will. and that is where you will find alot of plastic polishes. the best of which being meguiar's mirror glaze plastic polish.(mainly used on plane windows and auto headlights)

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IPaiz sent me a message that was to the point: "400 sandpaper: NOOOOOOOO!"

 

THE NUMBER IS 1200 or 1500 look at it in home depot, pep boys or sherwin williams store, this sand paper is usually used in paint and colission repair shops.

 

So....Finally got around to looking for this. My big local Home Deport has nada finer than 220!! So will try Auto Zone, etc.....

 

But if you're still following this thread, iPaiz (or anyone else with personal experience with this sanding technique), what did you think of the advice to wet the sandpaper before using it and to moisten the area you're going to apply it to??

 

:?:

 

PS: Think I'll opt for one of the plastic polishes mentioned (Filtz and others) in this thread rather than the polishing compound the latter are engineered for clear plastic surfaces and the latter for auto paint (and so may be slightly different).

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it just needs to be damp. not wet. "wet sanding" is only needed for scratches that polishing compounds will not take out. good luck.

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I have a similar problem on my iMac (big whoops by me for not putting it on a towel.)

I found this proceedure also which seems basically similar. I am going to try it over the Christmas Hols.

 

Found on http://www.diyfaq.org.uk/decorating.html#plastic

 

REMOVING SCRATCHES FROM PLASTIC

 

By Donald Gray 10/5/1996

 

You can do a great job re-polishing plastics, especially harder plastics like Perspex. It depends on the depth of scratch on which technique to use.

Deepish scratches:-

 

1. Start off with "Wet & Dry" paper (say grade 600) using a soapy water as a lubricant. (The water is vital to keep the paper grains free.) Gently "grind" away at the area until you cannot see the original scratches. (The area will go like frosted glass, but don't worry at this just yet!);

 

2. Change grade of Wet & Dry to 800 and do the same;

 

3. Change to grade 1200 wet & dry. do same grinding... (The basic principle behind this is to substitute deep scratches with shallower and shallower ones.);

 

4. Once you have got through the 1200 grade process, thoroughly clean &dry the area;

 

5. Use "Duraglit" or "Brasso" BRASS polish to remove the "frosted" effect;

 

6. Once this looks nice and shiny, use a SILVER polish to give a final finish.

For fine scratches, start at 4) above.

 

SECRET: Take time; don't rush it. Even when you think the scratches have gone, give the process a bit longer. There are NO short cuts to polishing, but it can be done in less time that one thinks....

 

Most DIY or car maintenance stores now stock the finer grades of "Wet & Dry" papers. (Tip: I keep a penknife razor sharp using 600 & 800 grade!) Don't forget: Soapy water is ESSENTIAL.

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What about scratches on the back silver shiny part on the 5th gens, how would i go about getting out the scratches.

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use a scotchbrite pad and scuff it to a satin finish so it looks good scratched or not.

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