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Joshua

Yonah Benchmarks!

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"Yonah" is the codename for a new processor that will more than likely be used in the first Intel Mac laptops. It's based on the Pentium M architecture, and looks very promising. Anandtech has benchmarks and a review of the chip, and I must say I'm quite impressed.

 

Review & Benchmarks:

 

http://anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=2627

 

It runs at 2.0 GHz, and it's dual-core. SSE instructions (the Intel equivalent of Altivec) have been reworked into it where they don't take as long to execute, thus speeding it up.

 

In 3D Studio Max rendering, it was 0.5 seconds slower than the AMD64 X2 4200+. 3D Rendering Benchmarks:

 

http://anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.a...aspx?i=2627&p=8

 

Considering that the X2 is a top-end desktop processor that completely kills all other Intel competition, Yonah is faring very well.

 

At 2.0GHz, Yonah is basically equal to, if not slightly slower than an Athlon 64 X2 running at the same clock speed in virtually all of the tests we ran. The important distinction here is that Intel is able to achieve that level of performance, without an on-die memory controller. But there is also one more thing to note, Yonah can offer that level of performance with significantly lower power consumption.

 

How much less power consumption? 108 watts vs. 144 watts while working, and 92 watts vs. 109 watts idle.

 

I can't wait until Conroe (the next step in Yonah's evolution) comes out!

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It is very doubtful. You will probably still see Apple selling their hardware at the premium prices. The thing that people pay for is the design of the hardware, and the fact that it just works compared to my Windoze boxes.

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Many people will think that Mac OSX wil get viruses beacues Windoze runs Intel and AMD. Its not true as the virus affetcts the operating system only and MAc OSX is rock solid.

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Many people will think that Mac OSX wil get viruses beacues Windoze runs Intel and AMD. Its not true as the virus affetcts the operating system only and MAc OSX is rock solid.

 

Well, in a way x86 is a tad bit less secure than PowerPC due to the difference in the way they handle data and instructions. In a program running on x86, the data and instructions are all in one stack, whereas in PowerPC they are seperated. The x86 way is more vulnerable to buffer overflows because of that design.

 

More information on what a buffer overflow is (needed to be read if you wish to understand the above): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffer_overflow

 

All that said, however, OSX will be much more secure than Windows. The processor change won't affect much at all.

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I still don't believe that Mac OS is anymore secure than Windows.... people still just type in their passwords and let it do whatever you want.... infact, all u need is your password, and it can modify the kernel and install a rootkit, just as easily, if not more easily.

 

The current Sony Rootkit thing proved it.... it infected Macs just as easily as PCs... OSx just makes it more annoying by having to enter a password.

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I still don't believe that Mac OS is anymore secure than Windows.... people still just type in their passwords and let it do whatever you want.... infact, all u need is your password, and it can modify the kernel and install a rootkit, just as easily, if not more easily.

 

The current Sony Rootkit thing proved it.... it infected Macs just as easily as PCs... OSx just makes it more annoying by having to enter a password.

 

You really don't know anything about operating systems, do you?

 

First of all, to install the Sony rootkit on Windows, you just need to insert the CD and click "I Agree". To do that on OSX, you must:

 

Navigate the CD.

Run start.app.

Enter your root password.

 

To remove it on OSX, you simply boot into safe mode and delete two kernel extensions. To remove it on Windows, it is MUCH more difficult.

 

OSX is many times more secure than Windows, period. Do us all a favor, and go educate yourself before you make anymore bonehead comments like that.

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that is just adding 3 steps.... notice it was actually just as easy..... it still modified the kernel super easy.... what's to stop it from doing the same thing like "Run this app to see Britney Spears naked" then they enter their password and it runs some Unix command that deletes all your files. nothing.....

 

or installing a rootkit, or other kernal extensions that u don't want, and don't even really know about... the problem with windows is most people just click ok to keep the flow going... the same thing would happen with typing in your password.

 

I know it was easy to get rid of, but if someone is making malware it might not be that easy next time, it depends on how deep it digs into the kernel.

 

It would be really easy to create a script that searchs your hard drive and deletes every .app file it finds... or deletes every .JPG file... or every .pref, or just deletes every file it finds...

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A person stupid enough to enter their password to run a pr0n app deserves to have their files deleted. That same application wouldn't even have to ask for permission on Windows.

 

Here's a little reading material incase you are wondering about what makes OSX more secure:

 

http://www.infowarrior.org/articles/2003-08.html

 

When I install an application, such as a word processor, I want to know with certainty that it will not modify my system internals. Similarly, when I remove the application, I want to know that when I remove it (by either the uninstaller or manually) it’s gone, and nothing of it remains on or has modified my system. Applications installed on Mac OS X don’t  modify the system internals – the Mac version of the Windows/System directory stays pretty intact. However, install nearly any program in Windows, and chances are it will (for example) place a different .DLL file in the Windows/System directory or even replace existing ones with its own version in what system administrators of earlier Windows versions grudgingly called "DLL Hell."  Want to remove the application? You’ve got two choices: completely remove the application (going beyond the software uninstaller to manually remove things like a power user) and risk breaking Windows or remove the application (via the software uninstaller) and let whatever it added or modified in Windows/System to remain, thus presenting you a newly-but-unofficially patched version of your operating system that may cause problems down the road. To make matters worse, Windows patches or updates often re-enable something you’ve previously turned off or deleted (such as VBScript or Internet Explorer) or reconfigures parts of your system (such as network shares) without your knowledge and potentially places you at risk of other security problems or future downtime. Apparently, Lance doesn't see this as a major security concern.

 

If you wish to discuss this further, make a new thread. I'll gladly continue there.

 

Back on topic,

 

I can't seem to find much more information on Yonah, but I suspect in the next few weeks more benchmarks will emerge. Hopefully, at MWSF we'll see an intel PowerBook! :D

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