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jslondon

Reliability of I-books and Powerbooks

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Please check out the following link http://www.macintouch.com/reliability/laptops.html.

 

It shows results of a user survey of reliability of Mac laptops over the past few years (there is also a related link at the bottom which includes windows laptops; Apple laptops compare well.)

 

I AM ASTOUNDED. Mac owners (and Apple Corp, presumably) are very happy with their machines even though they have failure rates of 25--40%!! (Indeed, I love my Powerbook).

 

Think about it differently: if Ford, or Mercedes, or Toyota produced cars (particularly those priced for 'high-end' buyers like Macs are priced) which had a return-for-repair or recall rate as high as for Apple laptops, they would be out of business!! Their reputations would be ruined. Apple particularly is vulnerable to this comparison, in that they control the customer experience from end to end (design, production, operating system, etc.) just as the car companies do.

 

Very few people who purchase cars are certified mechanics or engineers, yet all of us demand very high quality from a car purchase. If we are unlucky enough to be among the small pct subject to a recall, we then expect perfect service from the dealer to make it right.

 

Why do the 'non-techies' among us (myself inclusive) tolerate such mediocrity in computer production?

 

How can we convince Apple to do better?

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Why do the 'non-techies' among us (myself inclusive) tolerate such mediocrity in computer production?

 

Microsoft has started this trend. Most, hell, ALL computer users at one point or another have used a Windows machine. Many of the "converted" came from the Windows world where sortware is released much like a box of matzah and a movie from the 80's: Half Baked.

 

I have a hard time believing that the Macintosh has a 40% failure rate (my guess would be somewhere in the neighborhood of 20% or less). If we a community stopped buying the crap that Microsoft keeps dolling out then we stand a halfway decent chance of changing things over time.

 

However, there is always the "GOTTA BE FIRST TO MARKET" syndrome which, unfortunately, will only get worse with time.

 

- MT

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There is just one word to desribe this.......

 

Bollocks

 

To whom are you referring? JSLondon or myself?

 

- MT

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I have never had any issues with my iBook, which is why I am happy with it. If I had a failing iBook, then I may not be as happy. That is the answer to your question "why do we tolerate such mediocrity in computer production?" If i were to have a failing iBook I would be ticked, that's for sure. I'm not too sure what you're getting at.

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I have never had any issues with my iBook, which is why I am happy with it. If I had a failing iBook, then I may not be as happy. That is the answer to your question "why do we tolerate such mediocrity in computer production?" If i were to have a failing iBook I would be ticked, that's for sure. I'm not too sure what you're getting at.

 

I was trying to find these exact words. Well said, Mitch.

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JS, are you a Windows convert? If so, I can understand why you might be having trouble grasping the concept of working hardware. It's OK... take a deep breath... inhale... exhale... now smile. You're a Mac owner. :D

 

- MT

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I love my PowerBook (although i wanted a ibook for spac issues.) I have had problems where they have been 100 percent my fault Ie i leaned about partitioning!

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I love my PowerBook (although i wanted a ibook for spac issues.) I have had problems where they have been 100 percent my fault Ie i leaned about partitioning!

What do you mean, "spac issues?"

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I love my PowerBook (although i wanted a ibook for spac issues.) I have had problems where they have been 100 percent my fault Ie i leaned about partitioning!

What do you mean, "spac issues?"

 

Spac[e]?

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I'm not really sure this survey is completely inaccurate. I didn't analyze the research to see how the questions were worded, which might engender bias, AND I do think 40% is getting into the realm of fantasy,

 

But...

 

I was sitting around with two other Mac Users last night discussing CES, MacWorld, and our Mac using histories. Both of my compadres, although they are both Mac lovers, rattled off a litany of problems they'd had with various machines. One had replaced a superdrive four times in one machine. I was shocked because I've never had any problems with my Macs. (Knock on wood)

 

I'm thinking that the survey does have some bias because 40% seems a bit unacceptable for any industry; however, I'd bet real numbers are higher than I would like, possibly as high as 20%-30% (Just a guess though, no real evidence or foundation)

 

-Rob

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I know that the most recent batch (and the one before) of iBooks have been very stable. There were issues a few years back with iBooks crapping out, but that must've just been one generation of them.

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could we get the ezact numbers on where 40% is coming from. There are so many ways at looking a t afigurre like this, its unbelievable...i.e. what types of computers included (from how long ago). I assume they wouldnt be foolish enough to take the total number of computer sales ina year and relate it to the number of services orr calls into apple care. because god knows i call them about any little thing thats on my mind. sometimes just to have someone to talk to, lol. thats what i pay for.

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the link to the article doesn't work :(

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oh hang on... it's because the full stop has been included in the URL - delete that and you're in!

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i totaly agree with that survey, my powerbook (12 inch 1.33GHz) which is a year old has already had the harddrive and display go bad, both which were under the one year warranty, which got me nervous so i bought the applecare, but according to that survey all that's left is for my logic board to go bad, so as long as that happens ( might have already happened since some of my function keys don't work) i'll make my money back.

 

Compared to my windows copmuters the hardware doesn't seem to last as long but the software is a lot less of a pain

 

anyone know why a power supply would go bad on a PC after three years? it's happened to 3 of my copmuters now.

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I have an iBook, probably from that very reliable "last batch". No problems.

 

My mom has a PowerBook. It is 3 or 4 years old. No problems. And has been dropped on three separate occasions.

 

My dad has an iMac G5. No problems.

 

My family has had 2 iMac G3s: One was about 4 or 5 years old when we sold it because we needed more computer. It never had any problems.

 

We do not know how old the other iMac was. We got it second hand. It had a problem, but with no real effects... it started to overheat, burning anyone stupid enough to put their hand over it. However, the fact that the old iMacs could vent heat out the top very well stopped this from causing problems. All of the heat coming from the top was not in the computer. However, that may have been the cause of the next problem. There was always a huge buzzing, like the one a working hard drive, DVD drive, and or cooling fan would make. But it was loud. Very load. Almost like it was constantly running all three, full tilt. It also gradually got louder and softer... hard to describe, but almost as if the source of the noise was getting closer than farther away from you by a few feet, over a few seconds. It was just like a regular pulsing buzz...

However, none of this affected the computer, except for it slowing down a tiny bit, hardly noticable.

 

iBook: Good

PowerBook: Good

iMac G5: Good

iMac G3 (graphite): Good

iMac G3 (red): Problem

 

Sounds like 0.5 out of 5 failiure rate. That is like 1 out of 10, or 10%. Maybe 15%, who knows what the red iMac could be counted as....

 

Not 40%, at least in our house. And I have never had a friend tell me about a failing/failed Apple computer.

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Back after a bit, and glad to see the discussion developing. To answer the earlier enquiries, yes, I came from the Windows world about 2 years ago; I own 5 Mac laptops (G3 I-books and G4 Powerbooks); I find it to be a massively superior operating system.

 

As to the quality survey of 10,000 machines over the past few years: I find it appalling that even 20% of machines would fail, much less the 40% cited in the survey. Why would (should) consumers of any expensive product (TV's, DVD players, Automobiles, etc.) accept such a failure / repair rate?

 

Do I blame Apple? Yes, they put their name on the box. They enjoy the good side of their reputation (fabulous design, slick operating system, etc.) so they must also accept the responsibility for poor production and service processes. (And if MS were to put their names on the computer box, I would blame them, too!)

 

here is the link to the survey: read for yourself. http://www.macintouch.com/reliability/laptops.html

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