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cassiope

Safe passwords

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How to create real safe passwords:

 

Here is one for your password item: Use two words as a password separated by a space, these two words should NOT be related and most likely be separated by a number and another space, this is in my opinion the safest way to create a password because all password crackers don't expect a space being used.

 

Let alone two :)

 

The maximum number of characters that distinghuish is limited to 27 but heck who cares: "cat 100 dog" is good enough for the majority of macusers but you get the drift of it.

 

Note: Windows and most of the other OS-es around will not allow spaces to be used in passwords.

 

 

Hope this is a nice tip for all

 

Rob

The Netherlands

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How to create real safe passwords:

 

Here is one for your password item: Use two words as a password separated by a space, these two words should NOT be related and most likely be separated by a number and another space, this is in my opinion the safest way to create a password because all password crackers don't expect a space being used.

 

Let alone two :)

 

The maximum number of characters that distinghuish is limited to 27 but heck who cares: "cat 100 dog" is good enough for the majority of macusers but you get the drift of it.

 

Note: Windows and most of the other OS-es around will not allow spaces to be used in passwords.

 

 

Hope this is a nice tip for all

 

Rob

The Netherlands

 

I've never heard of spaces being any more secure than * ! _ ( ) { } [ ] or any other characters really. Is this really true and is there anything to support this claim?

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the fast majority of programs that crack passwords are made for use on windows

 

windows doesnt support spaces as is prohibited by databases like oracle and sql server.

Apple allows to add 27 digits in a password that are discriminatory, windows max is 16 17 may be used in some versions but spaces are prohibited, try it yourseldf.

 

FMP folows the Apple rule of thumb (27 and spaces)

 

Seen the amount of machines and software on the windows platform the chance for a person to use a password with a space in a login screen (be it the system of an application) is zilch so crackers dont span for them and when they find a space in a password they consider it a false positive and reject it.

 

See publications on this item by RSA, Verizon and the like as well as specialized universities that I talked to.

They all agreed that this scheme is much safer.

 

When you login many dont have access to a keyboard other then an ascii-set and on many systems the & and % aare prohibited.

 

regards

 

HTH

 

Rob

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interesting. never thought of it that way. if only i could change the password of my disk images

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if you have enough diskspace.

 

BTW the first time I noticed this space thing was allowed was when I used norton disklock to lock my disks, but that is over 10 years ago. Since then I use it always and try as I want it wont work on windows 98-xp and servers NT and above.

 

Linux didnt allow it in earlier days but maybe they lifted the limitation, Solaris and Irix wont allow it, AIX wont allow it, VAX/openVMS wont allow it either.

 

Hence my claim it is a heck of a lot safer

 

Regards

 

Rob

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if you have enough diskspace.

 

BTW the first time I noticed this space thing was allowed was when I used norton disklock to lock my disks, but that is over 10 years ago. Since then I use it always and try as I want it wont work on windows 98-xp and servers NT and above.

 

Linux didnt allow it in earlier days but maybe they lifted the limitation, Solaris and Irix wont allow it, AIX wont allow it, VAX/openVMS wont allow it either.

 

Hence my claim it is a heck of a lot safer

 

Regards

 

Rob

 

my disk images are 40+ GB. It stores tons of original photos and art designs from clients :cry:

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I got some 350+ Gig free

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Can you use the Option+whatever symbols in Mac passwords? I am sure a hacker would not expect my password to be "cat ◊ı˜ˆ dog"!

Too bad "option+shift+K" is not type-able on these forums :P

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in general these combinations should be availabe if and when they are within the ascii table.

control signs cannot be used (escape and such) but €???? are

yet remember these are tokens the hackers are looking for specifically because the space is either not allowed in windows and most unixes the space often is forgotten

 

HTH

 

Rob

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I'll tell you my passwords. I have 4 different types of passwords depending on need of security.

1: 7 digits-all numbers (was hacked once)

2: 14 digits-1 word with random letters, 7 numbers (no hack)

3: 20 digits-2 words with random letters in between, 7 numbers (no hack)

4: HIGHLY SECURE-20 digits-2 words, random letters, 7 numbers all separated (you guessed it, no hack)

 

Conclusion: Get a password with noth numbers and letters at least. To up the security use some caps lock or insert some symbols. My recommended password length is 15 digits, if it doesn't need that much security then 5-10 digits (save some space in your brain for storing other things). I only had to use my highly secure password because my 7 digits password was hacked.

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What I find annoying in the (mostly) system generated very secure password is you have to write them down remembering them is just simply too difficult.

 

Hence my suggestion two words separrated with a space or another space embedded number that will exceed easily 15 digits but are easier to remember without security flaw of written passwords.

 

Rob

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MAC original software do allow for spaces, others like Microsoft originated or Oracle originated do not hence the advantage for the Cocoa/Xcode community.

 

and then there always is the possibility to use strange ascii tokens for the connection between the different parts although some programs/systems limit the number of digits allowed for a password.

In general Apple grants 27 digits to be distinctive the rest being irrelevant/redundant information.

Oracle databases for instance force you to use ONE capped digit and at least one number, yet there is a limit of 16 digits in most of their systems.

 

Rob

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