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hurleyint1386

1.5 ghz vs. 1.67

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in september, im getting a loan refund, and i plan on buying a 15" powerbook. id like to upgrade the ram to a gig, and i want to have a super drive. i have 2 options with the processor speed, the 1.5 ghz and the 1.67. if i choose the 1.67 then if my calculations are correct, i'd be paying $165 for a .12 ghz upgrade. if anyone has used both, is that a noticeable difference? or should i save the money and just get the 1.5?

 

 

also, what are some "must have" accessories for the powerbook or any apple for that matter. ive got old mac's, but ive never had such a great amount of accessories to choose from.

 

one more question... do you think there would be any kind of upgrades to the powerbook before september? i figure apple might want to do some upgrades right before the beginning of a school year to encourage students to buy an apple. any hope of an upgraded powerbook? im very anxious to find out

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good question. i tried looking on the website to find out the processors front-side bus difference but it didn't list it. the front-side bus usually changes according to the upgrade in computer by about 100-200Mhz. the front-side bus is basically the highway that connects the processor to the rest of the computer. if you have a slow front-side bus, it doesn't matter how fast your processor is because the data simply can't get to and from that processor fast enough. a lot of people don't realize that when they think they have a great processor, you have to ask, can the data to and from that processor fast enough? secondly, 170Mhz is a pretty good amount more for a PowerPC processor. if it was an Intel i would say dont worry about it. so depending on if you need the speed you should get the better one, if you are just checking e-mail and web browsing, i would say save the hundred bucks.

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well i am a computer science major in college, so ill be doing a lot more than checking email and web browsing, however i wasnt sure if it was really that much faster. i figured that with a gig of ram, i should be fine, and that .17 ghz (sorry, bad math in the other one) would be that noticeable. but no one seems to be sure if there will be an upgraded powerbook by september. if there will be, then it seems like my question really wont matter, as i will probably be asking the same question about different clock speeds

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i think that .17 will make a difference (think- thats almost 200MHz which is about the same as a jump from 1.8GHz to a 2GHz which is also known to be a good jump.)

 

i also do not think that they will be coming out with a new Powerbook because they sorta recently released one. maybe a new one will come in several months

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My dad has a 1.67 GHz and I have a 1.5

 

I definitely do not notice a difference in speed between the two. Unless you plan on doing something really hard core to the thing, I doubt you'd be able to tell.

 

If you're concerned about $$$ don't worry about the 1.5 GHz...it's plenty fast for anything a college CS student needs to do (like me!).

 

Oh...and...the only "must have" accessory, in my opinion, is a two-button, bluetooth mouse. I have a macally BTMouseJr...it's not perfect, but for a BT mouse it's a good price, and it's a good size and all (has a scroll wheel, too).

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he said he is a computer science major so he will be doing the hard core stuff

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he said he is a computer science major so he will be doing the hard core stuff

 

I'm a CS major too. The kinds of stuff we do isn't "hard core" enough to notice a .17 difference in a processor. I've used both computers, and there really isn't too much of a difference.

 

When I said "hard core" I meant extremely processor-heavy activities...like if you needed your computer to solve really big, complicated math equations every day, then you might want the 1.67 GHz processor. But for every day stuff, and for the relatively small applications we've been making for my CS courses so far (and I'm halfway done), the 1.5 GHz has been more than enough.

 

Edit:

Granted, if you're focus is going to be graphics then perhaps you may want the stronger processor. But otherwise, 1.5 is sufficient for all of the "CS-major" related activities that I have done thus far.

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well actually, i talked to a mac geek at the apple store, and he said that unless im a gamer or a video editor, i wont notice the difference. however, he also said that i probably should upgrade only because when i buy it, it's paid for. you cant upgrade the processor. you can upgrade ram and stuff, but the processor you're stuck with. so he suggested upgrading as much as possible with the processor to kinda stay on top of things.

 

i still would like to try Xcode sometime, but every powerbook in any store doesnt have it because i assume they dont want anything to happen. just like they dont have access to the terminal (however some stores, like compusa have the terminal wide open. [-X haha) so can any CS majors let me know what you think of Xcode and how similar the terminal is to linux. im fairly confident with linux, so if it's very similar to mac unix code, then that would be great. thanks

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i still would like to try Xcode sometime, but every powerbook in any store doesnt have it because i assume they dont want anything to happen. just like they dont have access to the terminal (however some stores, like compusa have the terminal wide open. [-X haha) so can any CS majors let me know what you think of Xcode and how similar the terminal is to linux. im fairly confident with linux, so if it's very similar to mac unix code, then that would be great. thanks

 

Hey again. I have used XCode a bit. It's decent, but for the type of things I've had to write for my CS assignments there's a lot of extra stuff XCode produces that you really don't need.

 

I've never really been a Linux user, however I have used X11, and the Terminal in OS X is your typical unix terminal. It has most of the regular unix programs (vim, emacs, etc). I was never a unix-buff, however I am becoming moreso these days and I have not found any unix thing that the Terminal cannot do. X11-windowed applications don't work via Terminal, but you can install an X11 environment from the OS X CD if you need X11 apps (that's been helpful for me, since I can remotely login to my school's computers and use all their X11 software).

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i remember testing out the terminal, and one difference is that it's not case sensitive. but i think i tried vim and i didnt think it worked. ill need to try it again.

 

wth Xcode, is that a compiler kinda like gcc? basically write the code with vim, save it, then with the command line use something like "xcode -o testexe test.cpp"? or is it a whole program like visual studio? ill be doing system programming, assembly language, html and more c++ this coming semester.

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i remember testing out the terminal, and one difference is that it's not case sensitive. but i think i tried vim and i didnt think it worked. ill need to try it again.

 

wth Xcode, is that a compiler kinda like gcc? basically write the code with vim, save it, then with the command line use something like "xcode -o testexe test.cpp"? or is it a whole program like visual studio? ill be doing system programming, assembly language, html and more c++ this coming semester.

 

Yeah..vim should work. I live in vim, lol (also, if you just type vi, Terminal opens vim instead...).

 

XCode is a whole program like visual studio, but there should be a way to compile it in the terminal. I never tried that (if i compile c++ stuff in Terminal i just use g++), but there is way to tell vim to compile using XCode.

 

If you put this into .vimrc, typing "make" in vim will build any XCode Project file in the current directory:

set makeprg=/usr/bin/xcodebuild

 

I don't think XCode will compile individual files, though. I would suggest using g++ (or gcc or c++ or whatever you prefer) to compile seperate C++ files in the Terminal.

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I'm also a CS major and I used the Terminal for all my C and C++ projects last year. It seemed to work pretty well, considering they were being compiled by my professor on some Linux machine.

 

I just started using XCode this summer (because I taught myself Cocoa to write an app), and it seems pretty decent. I haven't used it a lot for C++, but it does have direct contact with the terminal for compiling. You basically just hit "Build", and it does all the linking and whatnot for you. Seems pretty convenient. I think it would also save a lot of time on correct indentation, as we are graded on style in my CS classes. The text coloring would also come in handy, to clear up coding as well.

 

I think that I would try out XCode to write it, but make sure to use the terminal and g++ it, just to verify it works. But thats just my two cents...

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one more question... do you think there would be any kind of upgrades to the powerbook before september? i figure apple might want to do some upgrades right before the beginning of a school year to encourage students to buy an apple. any hope of an upgraded powerbook? im very anxious to find out

 

Rumors are that Apple should be announcing upgrades to iBooks and Mini's sometime this week, but we'll see. I haven't heard rumors regarding Powerbooks, but the line hasn't had a significant upgrade in a long time, really just speed bumps.

 

I'd wait until the begining of the school year to buy. However, if you buy one and Apple announces updates soon after, you still have a great computer. #-o

 

-Rob

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so then i could have read wrong, but can you use gcc in mac os x?

 

yes. just like you would in linux:

 

gcc -o testexe test.o

 

(or g++ or c++ or whatever you want)

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ok that's easy enough. will i need to download gcc? or is it already built in to mac os x?

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ok that's easy enough. will i need to download gcc? or is it already built in to mac os x?

 

it's built in

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ok, awesome. im really glad i get so much help here! and people dont mock you for not knowing things. sorry this completely changed topics, but thanks a lot for the help!

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